Abstract

Heritage trails are an important route into accessing the histories of seaside resorts and communities. They are a multifaceted tourist product/experience, combining a series of complex tourism policy objectives around economic and cultural development. Trails are considered not just as a mechanism to historical learning about place but area located within a cultural politics of destination marketing and geographical imaginaries that spatialise the cultural heritage of place in different ways, emphasising local, transnational and global ‘claims to fame’. This chapter offers a critical overview of UK seaside heritage trails, based upon a mixed method qualitative study which included participatory research, site visits and a content analysis of trail brochures, leaflets, signage and web materials. A typology of seaside heritage trails is provided, to account for different social, political and economic objectives inherent in the proliferation of this significant coastal leisure product.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationHeritage and tourism in Britain and Ireland
EditorsG. Hooper
Place of PublicationLondon
PublisherPalgrave Macmillan
Pages195-212
Number of pages18
ISBN (Print)9781137520821
Publication statusPublished - 7 Mar 2017

Bibliographical note

Paul Gilchrist, 'Where do heritage trails go to die?' stepping out at the British seaside, 2017, Palgrave Macmillan UK, reproduced with permission of Palgrave Macmillan This extract is taken from the author's original manuscript and has not been edited. The definitive, published, version of record is available here: http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137520821

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