Culturally Influenced Learning: Why do some Students have Difficulty Visualising in 3D?

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBNResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This study is a continuation of a developing interest in the observed problems of a group of engineering students undertaking a first year BEng course in Mechanical Engineering, and in particular a module in Computer Aided Engineering and Design. A previous study had noted that some students arrive on the engineering course with a range of abilities in drawing and 3D (spatial) visualisation, and that these difficulties can be a significant barrier for progress. Other studies have shown that spatial visualization is a significant predictor for success on engineering courses, and that the ability to visualize objects, forces, moments and effects on physical bodies is vital to the development of core engineering skills. A significant number of students on the course are from overseas, and during the initial study it appeared that these students were more prone to experience difficulties in spatial visualization, as measured using a standardized test. Methods were evaluated to help these students improve, and these proved successful. This paper presents the latest results from the continued study, which explores a hypothesis that earlier learning and exposure to drawing, both Art and engineering, influences core spatial visualization, and that cultures which focus on traditional mathematical and science skills, may create issues for some students with respect to spatial visualisation. The study also incorporated analysis of a group of Product Design students with a very different profile in terms of their exposure to Art and drawing and their cultural background, as a means of providing contrast to the initial study.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the E&PDE 2014 16th International conference on Engineering and Product Design
Place of PublicationNetherlands
Pages255-262
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 14 Jul 2014
EventProceedings of the E&PDE 2014 16th International conference on Engineering and Product Design - University of Twente in Enschede, the Netherlands, 2014
Duration: 14 Jul 2014 → …

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the E&PDE 2014 16th International conference on Engineering and Product Design
Period14/07/14 → …

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visualization
engineering
learning
student
art
mechanical engineering
product design
ability
overseas
Group
science
experience

Cite this

Milne, M., Morris, R., Katz, T., Covill, D., & Elton, E. (2014). Culturally Influenced Learning: Why do some Students have Difficulty Visualising in 3D? In Proceedings of the E&PDE 2014 16th International conference on Engineering and Product Design (pp. 255-262). Netherlands.
Milne, Mark ; Morris, Richard ; Katz, Tim ; Covill, Derek ; Elton, Edward. / Culturally Influenced Learning: Why do some Students have Difficulty Visualising in 3D?. Proceedings of the E&PDE 2014 16th International conference on Engineering and Product Design. Netherlands, 2014. pp. 255-262
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Milne, M, Morris, R, Katz, T, Covill, D & Elton, E 2014, Culturally Influenced Learning: Why do some Students have Difficulty Visualising in 3D? in Proceedings of the E&PDE 2014 16th International conference on Engineering and Product Design. Netherlands, pp. 255-262, Proceedings of the E&PDE 2014 16th International conference on Engineering and Product Design, 14/07/14.

Culturally Influenced Learning: Why do some Students have Difficulty Visualising in 3D? / Milne, Mark; Morris, Richard; Katz, Tim; Covill, Derek; Elton, Edward.

Proceedings of the E&PDE 2014 16th International conference on Engineering and Product Design. Netherlands, 2014. p. 255-262.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBNResearchpeer-review

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Milne M, Morris R, Katz T, Covill D, Elton E. Culturally Influenced Learning: Why do some Students have Difficulty Visualising in 3D? In Proceedings of the E&PDE 2014 16th International conference on Engineering and Product Design. Netherlands. 2014. p. 255-262