The politics of medical and health ethics: collapsing goods and the moral climate

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In responding to Thomas Magnell's notion of 'collapsing goods', I draw attention to how medical and health ethics practices are not innocent, but political; and to suggest something about their relation to the moral climate. More specifically, I show that to take them as innocent, or as politically neutral, is not only a misunderstanding, but one that is likely to impact on the moral climate as well as being already a reflection of it. Ethics, and the various practices and understandings of health and medical ethics in particular, may well turn out to be collapsing goods.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)359-370
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Value Inquiry
Volume4
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

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