Men, Suicide and Vulnerability

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Suicide is the leading cause of death in men under the age of 45 in the UK, and men across the western world are more likely to commit suicide than women, this piece looks at the social factors behind this particularly the role of masculinity and access to services. Rates of male suicide are a common problem across the western world, and as funding for mental health services decline and male access to those services are staggeringly lower than for women, change is needed. The male suicide problem is often expressed in terms of masculinity; men are taught not to talk about their emotions as a sign of weakness and are less likely to form ‘meaningful’ relationships outside of their romantic ones. However, this only tells half of the story. I want to argue that, if this is the case, then services need to be reshaped for men to feel more comfortable when accessing them.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2018
EventUK Mental Disability Law Conference 2018 - University of Nottingham
Duration: 27 Jun 2018 → …

Conference

ConferenceUK Mental Disability Law Conference 2018
Period27/06/18 → …

Fingerprint

suicide
vulnerability
Western world
masculinity
cause of death
social factors
health service
emotion
funding
mental health

Cite this

Thompson, J. (2018). Men, Suicide and Vulnerability. Abstract from UK Mental Disability Law Conference 2018, .
Thompson, Jack. / Men, Suicide and Vulnerability. Abstract from UK Mental Disability Law Conference 2018, .
@conference{2c1e75be79b140e8ac02a50a15701e87,
title = "Men, Suicide and Vulnerability",
abstract = "Suicide is the leading cause of death in men under the age of 45 in the UK, and men across the western world are more likely to commit suicide than women, this piece looks at the social factors behind this particularly the role of masculinity and access to services. Rates of male suicide are a common problem across the western world, and as funding for mental health services decline and male access to those services are staggeringly lower than for women, change is needed. The male suicide problem is often expressed in terms of masculinity; men are taught not to talk about their emotions as a sign of weakness and are less likely to form ‘meaningful’ relationships outside of their romantic ones. However, this only tells half of the story. I want to argue that, if this is the case, then services need to be reshaped for men to feel more comfortable when accessing them.",
author = "Jack Thompson",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
note = "UK Mental Disability Law Conference 2018 ; Conference date: 27-06-2018",

}

Thompson, J 2018, 'Men, Suicide and Vulnerability' UK Mental Disability Law Conference 2018, 27/06/18, .

Men, Suicide and Vulnerability. / Thompson, Jack.

2018. Abstract from UK Mental Disability Law Conference 2018, .

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearchpeer-review

TY - CONF

T1 - Men, Suicide and Vulnerability

AU - Thompson, Jack

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Suicide is the leading cause of death in men under the age of 45 in the UK, and men across the western world are more likely to commit suicide than women, this piece looks at the social factors behind this particularly the role of masculinity and access to services. Rates of male suicide are a common problem across the western world, and as funding for mental health services decline and male access to those services are staggeringly lower than for women, change is needed. The male suicide problem is often expressed in terms of masculinity; men are taught not to talk about their emotions as a sign of weakness and are less likely to form ‘meaningful’ relationships outside of their romantic ones. However, this only tells half of the story. I want to argue that, if this is the case, then services need to be reshaped for men to feel more comfortable when accessing them.

AB - Suicide is the leading cause of death in men under the age of 45 in the UK, and men across the western world are more likely to commit suicide than women, this piece looks at the social factors behind this particularly the role of masculinity and access to services. Rates of male suicide are a common problem across the western world, and as funding for mental health services decline and male access to those services are staggeringly lower than for women, change is needed. The male suicide problem is often expressed in terms of masculinity; men are taught not to talk about their emotions as a sign of weakness and are less likely to form ‘meaningful’ relationships outside of their romantic ones. However, this only tells half of the story. I want to argue that, if this is the case, then services need to be reshaped for men to feel more comfortable when accessing them.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Thompson J. Men, Suicide and Vulnerability. 2018. Abstract from UK Mental Disability Law Conference 2018, .