"Without the Consumers of Slave Produce There Would Be No Slaves": Quaker Women, Antislavery Activism, and Free-Labor Cotton Dress in the 1850s

Anna Vaughan Kett

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNChapter

Abstract

This chapter demonstrates the ways in which dress can be used as a powerful interpretative tool, in understanding how the Quaker family, and especially women, engaged with antislavery activism in the 1850s. It takes as a point of departure a pair of unique photographs, dubbed here the "free produce photographs." They show the Clark family, of West-Country shoemaking fame, dressed in striking checked and striped clothes made from cotton not made by slaves. Thus they evidence an important but little-known activity in the Transatlantic antislavery movement, known as the Free Produce Movement.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationQuakers and Abolition
EditorsB. Carey, G. Plank
Place of PublicationUrbana, Chicago and Springfield, USA
PublisherUniversity of Illinois Press
Pages56-72
Number of pages17
ISBN (Print)9780252038266
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

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