What the Rankine-Hugoniot relations tell us about co-rotating interaction regions in the solar wind, and what they don't

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Abstract

Co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs) are the result of a fast solar wind streat catching up with a slow stream ahead. The simplest description of a CIR portrays it as a compression region bounded by two fast shock waves. A tangential discontinuity within the CIR separates the shocked fast and slow solar wind streams. In this paper we assume that the Rankine-Hugoniot relations apply across both shocks. These relations are then used to predict the properties of the two shocked plasma states within a set of CIRs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft. The obtained properties are examined for consistency with the simple description of a CIR outlined above and the possible reasons for the observed discrepancies are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Les Woolliscroft Memorial Conference/Sheffield Space Plasma Meeting: Multi-Point Measurements versus Theory
Pages45-52
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2001
EventProceedings of the Les Woolliscroft Memorial Conference/Sheffield Space Plasma Meeting: Multi-Point Measurements versus Theory - Sheffield, UK
Duration: 1 Apr 2001 → …

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the Les Woolliscroft Memorial Conference/Sheffield Space Plasma Meeting: Multi-Point Measurements versus Theory
Period1/04/01 → …

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    Wilkinson, W. (2001). What the Rankine-Hugoniot relations tell us about co-rotating interaction regions in the solar wind, and what they don't. In Proceedings of the Les Woolliscroft Memorial Conference/Sheffield Space Plasma Meeting: Multi-Point Measurements versus Theory (pp. 45-52) http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu//full/2001ESASP.492...45W/0000052.000.html