What factors influence a pharmacist’s decision whether or not to supply or sell medicines to children under the age of 16

Angela Macadam, O. Marfo-Mensah

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

There is clear guidance for pharmacists in the professionalstandards and guidance document on consent to treatment for children.[1] The guidance, for children under 16, is based upon the Gillick[2] case, which determined that if a child demonstrates sufficient understanding to enable them to understand fully what is being proposed, they are Gillick competent and can consent to treatment. However, there is no guidance for pharmacists about supplying or selling medicines to children. For instance, if a child brings a prescription into a pharmacy on behalf of an adult, there is no specific guidance about whether to sell or supply the item to the child. The Gillick rule is not relevant as it is not about a child’s competency to consent; it is about the pharmacist determining whether a child should be given the responsibility to deliver a medicine safely. The purpose of this study was to determine what factors influence pharmacists’ decisions whether or not to supply or sell medicines to children under the age of 16.
Original languageEnglish
Pages29-29
Number of pages1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2010
EventHealth Services Research & Pharmacy Practice Conference - Manchester, UK, 12-13 April 2010
Duration: 1 Jun 2010 → …

Conference

ConferenceHealth Services Research & Pharmacy Practice Conference
Period1/06/10 → …

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Pharmacists
Child Guidance
Consent Forms
Prescriptions
Medicine
Therapeutics

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Macadam, Angela ; Marfo-Mensah, O. / What factors influence a pharmacist’s decision whether or not to supply or sell medicines to children under the age of 16. Abstract from Health Services Research & Pharmacy Practice Conference, .1 p.
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What factors influence a pharmacist’s decision whether or not to supply or sell medicines to children under the age of 16. / Macadam, Angela; Marfo-Mensah, O.

2010. 29-29 Abstract from Health Services Research & Pharmacy Practice Conference, .

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

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