The Global Information Age: Wireless technology's transformative potential in knowledge-based society

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Abstract

This paper argues that mobile technology is qualitatively different to other information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the context of achieving the political aims and objectives of the ‘information society’. Crucial to this claim is the belief that mobile devices are becoming increasingly integral to the lives of users – whether for work or leisure, and that they are inherently transformative. Their ‘always-on’ connectivity and increasing processing [1] power and capabilities distinguishes them from other ICTs. Their functionality goes beyond voice and data transfer. Their potential for identity confirmation and networking, for example, is unmatched – though there are considerable dangers. These include, amongst others, involuntary exclusion, surveillance, privacy, accountability and the need for openness. In many cases these are political questions that cannot be left to the market.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationM-Business 2002
Publication statusPublished - 2002
EventM-Business 2002 - Athens, Greece
Duration: 1 Jan 2002 → …

Conference

ConferenceM-Business 2002
Period1/01/02 → …

Keywords

  • Mobile technologies
  • CENTRIM

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