The Art Schools of North West, England: Exhibition of photographs and texts

Matthew Cornford, John Beck

Research output: Non-textual outputExhibitionResearch

Abstract

The art schools of the North West were a product of the region’s industrial power during the nineteenth century, institutions aimed at meeting the needs of industrialists, workers and civic leaders. Many art schools grew out of Mechanics’ Institutes and other mutual improvement organisations that provided education and training for workers. Support for industrial training was good business, but the rising middle class also had cultural ambitions and art schools, along with galleries and museums, were often conceived as agents of aesthetic cultivation.

This combustible mix of the practical and the creative, of working- and middle-class aspirations, made art schools often contradictory sites of cultural exploration and social change. The names, locations and functions of the art schools have shifted, turned and turned again with the seasons. John Beck and Matthew Cornford have anchored their survey with information dug out of the archives, but the record remains patchy and incomplete, scattered, buried or unwritten.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationLiverpool
EditionBluecoat
Size31 Framed photographs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Nov 2018

Fingerprint

England
Art School
Workers
Middle Class
Aesthetics
Contradictory
Incomplete
Names
Working Class
Industrialists
Civics
Aspiration
Education
Ambition
Cultural Change

Keywords

  • art, design and cultural history
  • photograph
  • Architecture

Cite this

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The Art Schools of North West, England : Exhibition of photographs and texts. Cornford, Matthew (Author/Creator); Beck, John (Author/Creator). 2018. Liverpool.

Research output: Non-textual outputExhibitionResearch

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