Taking counselling and psychotherapy outside: destruction or enrichment of the therapeutic frame?

Martin Jordan, H. Marshall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper will explore emerging issues in the practice of counselling and psychotherapy in the outdoors, which the authors encountered when they took their clients outside of the traditional therapy room. The outdoors is defined as natural areas and spaces, such as woods and parks which have been termed ‘nearby nature’ (Kaplan and Kaplan, 1989) and also more remote areas such as mountains and moors which are more isolated from civilisation, what some have termed wilderness (Mcfarlane, 2007). Particular emphasis will be given to the ‘frame’ of psychotherapy and how aspects of this are affected by moving outdoors, in particular contracting in relation to confidentiality and timing. The relationship in psychotherapy will be explored in relation to issues of mutuality and asymmetry alongside the role of nature in the therapeutic process. Lastly the challenges and therapeutic potential of psychotherapy in nature will be explored.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-359
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Journal of Psychotherapy and Counselling
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Dec 2010

Keywords

  • frame
  • outdoors
  • nature
  • contract
  • ecotherapy

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