Sounds nothing like the sea

Maria Papadomanolaki, Dawn Scarfe, Grant Smith, Max Baraitser Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A short text and an online player present live sounds from the Pacific Ocean, discovered in the course of the Reveil 24 hour radio broadcast over 2 to 3 May 2015. Reveil follows the dawn chorus around the world via live audio feeds provided by a dispersed community of streamers. Travelling at the speed of the earth's rotation at its surface, which is also the apparent speed of daybreak, it takes about 4 1/2 hours to cross the Pacific, from the time you leave the foothills of the Santa Cruz mountains at the ocean, to landfall on the island of Tabushima. Coming to the beach with workaday expectations of what the ocean will be like, in the course of a long and monotonous passage on hydrophones and remote radio intercepts, we chart our emerging sense of a more elusive and intriguing sonic object.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-39
Number of pages2
JournalPerformance Research
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 May 2016

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ocean
radio
hydrophone
Earth rotation
beach
mountain
sea
speed
world
sound

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Performance Research on 03/05/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13528165.2016.1173909

Cite this

Papadomanolaki, M., Scarfe, D., Smith, G., & Baraitser Smith, M. (2016). Sounds nothing like the sea. Performance Research, 21(2), 38-39. https://doi.org/10.1080/13528165.2016.1173909
Papadomanolaki, Maria ; Scarfe, Dawn ; Smith, Grant ; Baraitser Smith, Max. / Sounds nothing like the sea. In: Performance Research. 2016 ; Vol. 21, No. 2. pp. 38-39.
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Papadomanolaki, M, Scarfe, D, Smith, G & Baraitser Smith, M 2016, 'Sounds nothing like the sea', Performance Research, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 38-39. https://doi.org/10.1080/13528165.2016.1173909

Sounds nothing like the sea. / Papadomanolaki, Maria; Scarfe, Dawn; Smith, Grant; Baraitser Smith, Max.

In: Performance Research, Vol. 21, No. 2, 03.05.2016, p. 38-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Papadomanolaki M, Scarfe D, Smith G, Baraitser Smith M. Sounds nothing like the sea. Performance Research. 2016 May 3;21(2):38-39. https://doi.org/10.1080/13528165.2016.1173909