Older people's family contacts and long-term care expenditure in OECD countries: a comparative approach using qualitative comparative analysis

Philip Haynes, Michael Hill, Laura Banks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

In recent decades there has been a suggestion that public and private long-term care (LTC) expenditure might be replacing traditional family care for older people. The decline of family contact is known to be more advanced in some OECD countries than others, with southern Europe identified as where family contact is still strong. This article explores at a country level whether there is an association between levels of expenditure on long-term care and the vailability of family contacts. Qualitative Comparative Analysis is used as a comparative method, so as to use national quantitative indicators with a small sample of countries. An association between higher levels of family contact and lower levels of expenditure on LTC is suggested, but it is weakened by a number of untypical cases. Countries that defy this relationship have government care policies that seek to promote informal social care through the family contact that continues to be available. Austria, Canada, Great Britain and Japan are discussed in this context.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-84
Number of pages18
JournalSocial policy and administration
Volume44
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010

Bibliographical note

© 2010 Blackwell Publishing

Keywords

  • older people
  • long-term care
  • qualitative analysis
  • family contact
  • OECD

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