Learning to express “left- right” & “front-back” in a sign versus spoken language

Beyza Sümer, Pamela Perniss, Inge Zwitserlood, Aslı Ozyurek

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBN

Abstract

Developmental studies show that it takes longer for children learning spoken languages to acquire viewpoint- dependent spatial relations (e.g., "left-right", "front- behind"), compared to the ones that do not (e.g., "in", "on", "under"). The current study investigates how children learn to express viewpoint-dependent relations in a sign language where depicted spatial relations can be communicated in an analogue manner in the space in front of the body or by using body-anchored signs (e.g., tapping the right and left hand/arm to mean LEFT and RIGHT). Our results indicate that visual-spatial modality might have a facilitating effect on learning to express these spatial relations (especially in encoding of "left- right") in a sign language (i.e., Turkish Sign Language) compared to a spoken language (i.e., Turkish).
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society
Place of PublicationAustin, TX
PublisherCognitive Science Society
Pages1550-1555
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9780991196708
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventProceedings of the 36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society - Quebec City, Canada, 23-26 July 2014
Duration: 1 Jan 2014 → …

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society
Period1/01/14 → …

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    Sümer, B., Perniss, P., Zwitserlood, I., & Ozyurek, A. (2014). Learning to express “left- right” & “front-back” in a sign versus spoken language. In Proceedings of the 36th Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society (pp. 1550-1555). Cognitive Science Society.