Internalized sexual orientation stigma and mental health in a religiously diverse sample of gay and bisexual men in Lebanon

Ismael Maatouk, Rusi Jaspal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study explores the correlates of internalized sexual orientation stigma, psychological distress and depression in a religiously diverse sample of gay and bisexual men in Lebanon. A convenience sample of 200 participants completed a cross-sectional survey. Bisexual men reported greater internalized sexual orientation stigma and less outness to their family and were more likely to face family pressure to have a heterosexual marriage than gay men. People of no religion reported more outness than Muslims and Christians but also higher psychological distress and depression. Multiple regression analyses showed that religiosity, outness, family pressure to marry and sexual orientation were positively associated with internalized sexual orientation stigma; and that frequency of attending one’s place of worship was negatively associated with psychological distress and depression. Individuals may be coping with adversity through engagement with institutionalized religion, which also appears to be a source of negative social representations concerning their sexuality.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Homosexuality
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 31 Dec 2021

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Internalized sexual orientation stigma and mental health in a religiously diverse sample of gay and bisexual men in Lebanon'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this