Human resource inequalities at the base of India's public health care system

Saseendran Pallikadavath, Abhishek Singh, Reuben Ogollah, Taraneh Dean, William Stones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper examines the extent of inequalities in human resource provision at India's Heath Sub-Centres (HSC) - first level of service provision in the public health system. ‘Within state' inequality explained about 71% and ‘between state’ inequality explained the remaining 29% of the overall inter-HSC inequality. The Northern states had a lower health worker share relative to the extent of their HSC provision. Contextual factors that contributed to ‘between’ and ‘within’ district inequalities were the percentages of villages connected with all-weather roads and having primary schools. Analysis demonstrates a policy and programming need to address ‘within State’ inequalities as a priority.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-32
Number of pages7
JournalHealth & Place
Volume23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 May 2013

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human resources
public health
health care
India
primary school
village
programming
road
district
worker
health

Bibliographical note

© 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. Open access under CC BY license.

Cite this

Pallikadavath, Saseendran ; Singh, Abhishek ; Ogollah, Reuben ; Dean, Taraneh ; Stones, William. / Human resource inequalities at the base of India's public health care system. In: Health & Place. 2013 ; Vol. 23. pp. 26-32.
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Human resource inequalities at the base of India's public health care system. / Pallikadavath, Saseendran; Singh, Abhishek; Ogollah, Reuben; Dean, Taraneh; Stones, William.

In: Health & Place, Vol. 23, 22.05.2013, p. 26-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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