Heat acclimation improves sweat gland function and lowers sweat sodium concentration in an adult with cystic fibrosis

Ashley Willmott, Robert Holliss, Zoe Saynor, Joe Corbett, Adam Causer, Neil Maxwell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We present novel data concerning the time-course of adaptations and potential benefits of heat acclimation for people with cystic fibrosis (pwCF), who are at greater risk of exertional heat illness. A 25-year-old male (genotype: delta-F508 and RH117, forced expiratory volume in 1-second: 77% predicted and baseline sweat [Na+]: 70 mmol∙L-1), who had previously experienced muscle cramping during exercise in ambient heat, underwent 10-sessions of heat acclimation (90-min at 40°C and in 40% relative humidity). Adaptations included; lower resting core temperature (-0.40°C) and heart rate (-6 beats∙min-1), plasma volume expansion (+6.0%) and, importantly, increased sweat loss (+370 mL) and sweat gland activity (+12 glands∙cm2) with decreased sweat [Na+] (-18 mmol∙L-1). Adaptations were maintained for at least 7-days, with no evidence of cramping during follow-up exercise-heat stress testing. These data suggest pwCF may benefit from heat acclimation to induce sudomotor function improvements, particularly reductions in sweat [Na+], however, further research is required.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Cystic Fibrosis
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Adaptation
  • Cystic fibrosis
  • Heat acclimation
  • Heat stress
  • Sweat sodium concentration

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