Exploiting human and mouse transcriptomic data: Identification of circadiangenes and pathways influencing health

Emma Laing, Jonathan D. Johnston, Carla Moller-Levet, Giselda Bucca, Colin Smith, Derk-Jan Dijk, Simon N. Archer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The power of the application of bioinformatics across multiplepublicly available transcriptomic data sets was explored. Using 19 human and mouse circadian transcriptomic data sets, we found that NR1D1 and NR1D2 which encode heme- responsive nuclear receptors are the most rhythmic tran- scripts across sleep conditions and tissues suggesting that they are at the core of circadian rhythm generation. Analyzes of human transcriptomic data show that a core set of transcripts related to processes including immune function, glucocorticoid signalling, and lipid metabolism is rhythmically expressed independently of the sleep-wake cycle. We also identify key transcripts associated with transcription and translation that are disrupted by sleep manipulations, and through network analysis identify putative mechanisms underlying the adverse health outcomes associated with sleep disruption, such as diabetes and cancer. Comparative bioinformatics applied toexisting and future data sets will be a powerful tool for the identification of core circadian- andsleep-dependent molecules.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)544-556
Number of pages13
JournalBioessays
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Mar 2015

Bibliographical note

This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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