Effects of prior heavy exercise on phase II pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics during heavy exercise

Mark Burnley, Andrew M. Jones, Helen Carter, Jonathan Doust

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Abstract

We tested the hypothesis that heavy-exercise phase II oxygen uptake (VO(2)) kinetics could be speeded by prior heavy exercise. Ten subjects performed four protocols involving 6-min exercise bouts on a cycle ergometer separated by 6 min of recovery: 1) moderate followed by moderate exercise; 2) moderate followed by heavy exercise; 3) heavy followed by moderate exercise; and 4) heavy followed by heavy exercise. The VO(2) responses were modeled using two (moderate exercise) or three (heavy exercise) independent exponential terms. Neither moderate- nor heavy-intensity exercise had an effect on the VO(2) kinetic response to subsequent moderate exercise. Although heavy-intensity exercise significantly reduced the mean response time in the second heavy exercise bout (from 65.2 +/- 4.1 to 47.0 +/- 3.1 s; P < 0.05), it had no significant effect on either the amplitude or the time constant (from 23.9 +/- 1.9 to 25.3 +/- 2.9 s) of the VO(2) response in phase II. Instead, this "speeding" was due to a significant reduction in the amplitude of the VO(2) slow component. These results suggest phase II VO(2) kinetics are not speeded by prior heavy exercise.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1387-1396
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume89
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2000

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title = "Effects of prior heavy exercise on phase II pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics during heavy exercise",
abstract = "We tested the hypothesis that heavy-exercise phase II oxygen uptake (VO(2)) kinetics could be speeded by prior heavy exercise. Ten subjects performed four protocols involving 6-min exercise bouts on a cycle ergometer separated by 6 min of recovery: 1) moderate followed by moderate exercise; 2) moderate followed by heavy exercise; 3) heavy followed by moderate exercise; and 4) heavy followed by heavy exercise. The VO(2) responses were modeled using two (moderate exercise) or three (heavy exercise) independent exponential terms. Neither moderate- nor heavy-intensity exercise had an effect on the VO(2) kinetic response to subsequent moderate exercise. Although heavy-intensity exercise significantly reduced the mean response time in the second heavy exercise bout (from 65.2 +/- 4.1 to 47.0 +/- 3.1 s; P < 0.05), it had no significant effect on either the amplitude or the time constant (from 23.9 +/- 1.9 to 25.3 +/- 2.9 s) of the VO(2) response in phase II. Instead, this {"}speeding{"} was due to a significant reduction in the amplitude of the VO(2) slow component. These results suggest phase II VO(2) kinetics are not speeded by prior heavy exercise.",
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Effects of prior heavy exercise on phase II pulmonary oxygen uptake kinetics during heavy exercise. / Burnley, Mark; Jones, Andrew M.; Carter, Helen; Doust, Jonathan.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 89, No. 4, 31.10.2000, p. 1387-1396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

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AU - Burnley, Mark

AU - Jones, Andrew M.

AU - Carter, Helen

AU - Doust, Jonathan

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N2 - We tested the hypothesis that heavy-exercise phase II oxygen uptake (VO(2)) kinetics could be speeded by prior heavy exercise. Ten subjects performed four protocols involving 6-min exercise bouts on a cycle ergometer separated by 6 min of recovery: 1) moderate followed by moderate exercise; 2) moderate followed by heavy exercise; 3) heavy followed by moderate exercise; and 4) heavy followed by heavy exercise. The VO(2) responses were modeled using two (moderate exercise) or three (heavy exercise) independent exponential terms. Neither moderate- nor heavy-intensity exercise had an effect on the VO(2) kinetic response to subsequent moderate exercise. Although heavy-intensity exercise significantly reduced the mean response time in the second heavy exercise bout (from 65.2 +/- 4.1 to 47.0 +/- 3.1 s; P < 0.05), it had no significant effect on either the amplitude or the time constant (from 23.9 +/- 1.9 to 25.3 +/- 2.9 s) of the VO(2) response in phase II. Instead, this "speeding" was due to a significant reduction in the amplitude of the VO(2) slow component. These results suggest phase II VO(2) kinetics are not speeded by prior heavy exercise.

AB - We tested the hypothesis that heavy-exercise phase II oxygen uptake (VO(2)) kinetics could be speeded by prior heavy exercise. Ten subjects performed four protocols involving 6-min exercise bouts on a cycle ergometer separated by 6 min of recovery: 1) moderate followed by moderate exercise; 2) moderate followed by heavy exercise; 3) heavy followed by moderate exercise; and 4) heavy followed by heavy exercise. The VO(2) responses were modeled using two (moderate exercise) or three (heavy exercise) independent exponential terms. Neither moderate- nor heavy-intensity exercise had an effect on the VO(2) kinetic response to subsequent moderate exercise. Although heavy-intensity exercise significantly reduced the mean response time in the second heavy exercise bout (from 65.2 +/- 4.1 to 47.0 +/- 3.1 s; P < 0.05), it had no significant effect on either the amplitude or the time constant (from 23.9 +/- 1.9 to 25.3 +/- 2.9 s) of the VO(2) response in phase II. Instead, this "speeding" was due to a significant reduction in the amplitude of the VO(2) slow component. These results suggest phase II VO(2) kinetics are not speeded by prior heavy exercise.

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