Effect of 6 weeks of endurance training on the lactate minimum speed

Helen Carter, Andrew M. Jones, Jonathan Doust

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity of the lactate minimum speed test to changes in endurance fitness resulting from a 6 week training intervention. Sixteen participants (mean +/- s: age 23+/-4 years; body mass 69.7+/-9.1 kg) completed 6 weeks of endurance training. Another eight participants (age 23+/-4 years; body mass 72.7+/-12.5 kg) acted as non-training controls. Before and after the training intervention, all participants completed: (1) a standard multi-stage treadmill test for the assessment of VO2max, running speed at the lactate threshold and running speed at a reference blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1); and (2) the lactate minimum speed test, which involved two supramaximal exercise bouts and an 8 min walking recovery period to increase blood lactate concentration before the completion of an incremental treadmill test. Additionally, a subgroup of eight participants from the training intervention completed a series of constant-speed runs for determination of running speed at the maximal lactate steady state. The test protocols were identical before and after the 6 week intervention. The control group showed no significant changes in VO2max, running speed at the lactate threshold, running speed at a blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1) or the lactate minimum speed. In the training group, there was a significant increase in VO2max (from 47.9+/-8.4 to 52.2+/-2.7 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)), running speed at the maximal lactate steady state (from 13.3+/-1.7 to 13.9+/-1.6 km x h(-1)), running speed at the lactate threshold (from 11.2+/-1.8 to 11.9+/-1.8 km x h(-1)) and running speed at a blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1) (from 12.5+/-2.2 to 13.2+/-2.1 km x h(-1)) (all P < 0.05). Despite these clear improvements in aerobic fitness, there was no significant difference in lactate minimum speed after the training intervention (from 11.0+/-0.7 to 10.9+/-1.7 km x h(-1)). The results demonstrate that the lactate minimum speed, when assessed using the same exercise protocol before and after 6 weeks of aerobic exercise training, is not sensitive to changes in endurance capacity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)957-967
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Volume17
Issue number12
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 1999

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Lactic Acid
Running
Exercise Test
Exercise
Walking
Control Groups

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@article{a111478f68824d4f8d81b987153932c2,
title = "Effect of 6 weeks of endurance training on the lactate minimum speed",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity of the lactate minimum speed test to changes in endurance fitness resulting from a 6 week training intervention. Sixteen participants (mean +/- s: age 23+/-4 years; body mass 69.7+/-9.1 kg) completed 6 weeks of endurance training. Another eight participants (age 23+/-4 years; body mass 72.7+/-12.5 kg) acted as non-training controls. Before and after the training intervention, all participants completed: (1) a standard multi-stage treadmill test for the assessment of VO2max, running speed at the lactate threshold and running speed at a reference blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1); and (2) the lactate minimum speed test, which involved two supramaximal exercise bouts and an 8 min walking recovery period to increase blood lactate concentration before the completion of an incremental treadmill test. Additionally, a subgroup of eight participants from the training intervention completed a series of constant-speed runs for determination of running speed at the maximal lactate steady state. The test protocols were identical before and after the 6 week intervention. The control group showed no significant changes in VO2max, running speed at the lactate threshold, running speed at a blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1) or the lactate minimum speed. In the training group, there was a significant increase in VO2max (from 47.9+/-8.4 to 52.2+/-2.7 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)), running speed at the maximal lactate steady state (from 13.3+/-1.7 to 13.9+/-1.6 km x h(-1)), running speed at the lactate threshold (from 11.2+/-1.8 to 11.9+/-1.8 km x h(-1)) and running speed at a blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1) (from 12.5+/-2.2 to 13.2+/-2.1 km x h(-1)) (all P < 0.05). Despite these clear improvements in aerobic fitness, there was no significant difference in lactate minimum speed after the training intervention (from 11.0+/-0.7 to 10.9+/-1.7 km x h(-1)). The results demonstrate that the lactate minimum speed, when assessed using the same exercise protocol before and after 6 weeks of aerobic exercise training, is not sensitive to changes in endurance capacity.",
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Effect of 6 weeks of endurance training on the lactate minimum speed. / Carter, Helen; Jones, Andrew M.; Doust, Jonathan.

In: Journal of Sports Sciences, Vol. 17, No. 12, 31.12.1999, p. 957-967.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of 6 weeks of endurance training on the lactate minimum speed

AU - Carter, Helen

AU - Jones, Andrew M.

AU - Doust, Jonathan

PY - 1999/12/31

Y1 - 1999/12/31

N2 - The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity of the lactate minimum speed test to changes in endurance fitness resulting from a 6 week training intervention. Sixteen participants (mean +/- s: age 23+/-4 years; body mass 69.7+/-9.1 kg) completed 6 weeks of endurance training. Another eight participants (age 23+/-4 years; body mass 72.7+/-12.5 kg) acted as non-training controls. Before and after the training intervention, all participants completed: (1) a standard multi-stage treadmill test for the assessment of VO2max, running speed at the lactate threshold and running speed at a reference blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1); and (2) the lactate minimum speed test, which involved two supramaximal exercise bouts and an 8 min walking recovery period to increase blood lactate concentration before the completion of an incremental treadmill test. Additionally, a subgroup of eight participants from the training intervention completed a series of constant-speed runs for determination of running speed at the maximal lactate steady state. The test protocols were identical before and after the 6 week intervention. The control group showed no significant changes in VO2max, running speed at the lactate threshold, running speed at a blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1) or the lactate minimum speed. In the training group, there was a significant increase in VO2max (from 47.9+/-8.4 to 52.2+/-2.7 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)), running speed at the maximal lactate steady state (from 13.3+/-1.7 to 13.9+/-1.6 km x h(-1)), running speed at the lactate threshold (from 11.2+/-1.8 to 11.9+/-1.8 km x h(-1)) and running speed at a blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1) (from 12.5+/-2.2 to 13.2+/-2.1 km x h(-1)) (all P < 0.05). Despite these clear improvements in aerobic fitness, there was no significant difference in lactate minimum speed after the training intervention (from 11.0+/-0.7 to 10.9+/-1.7 km x h(-1)). The results demonstrate that the lactate minimum speed, when assessed using the same exercise protocol before and after 6 weeks of aerobic exercise training, is not sensitive to changes in endurance capacity.

AB - The aim of this study was to assess the sensitivity of the lactate minimum speed test to changes in endurance fitness resulting from a 6 week training intervention. Sixteen participants (mean +/- s: age 23+/-4 years; body mass 69.7+/-9.1 kg) completed 6 weeks of endurance training. Another eight participants (age 23+/-4 years; body mass 72.7+/-12.5 kg) acted as non-training controls. Before and after the training intervention, all participants completed: (1) a standard multi-stage treadmill test for the assessment of VO2max, running speed at the lactate threshold and running speed at a reference blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1); and (2) the lactate minimum speed test, which involved two supramaximal exercise bouts and an 8 min walking recovery period to increase blood lactate concentration before the completion of an incremental treadmill test. Additionally, a subgroup of eight participants from the training intervention completed a series of constant-speed runs for determination of running speed at the maximal lactate steady state. The test protocols were identical before and after the 6 week intervention. The control group showed no significant changes in VO2max, running speed at the lactate threshold, running speed at a blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1) or the lactate minimum speed. In the training group, there was a significant increase in VO2max (from 47.9+/-8.4 to 52.2+/-2.7 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)), running speed at the maximal lactate steady state (from 13.3+/-1.7 to 13.9+/-1.6 km x h(-1)), running speed at the lactate threshold (from 11.2+/-1.8 to 11.9+/-1.8 km x h(-1)) and running speed at a blood lactate concentration of 3 mmol x l(-1) (from 12.5+/-2.2 to 13.2+/-2.1 km x h(-1)) (all P < 0.05). Despite these clear improvements in aerobic fitness, there was no significant difference in lactate minimum speed after the training intervention (from 11.0+/-0.7 to 10.9+/-1.7 km x h(-1)). The results demonstrate that the lactate minimum speed, when assessed using the same exercise protocol before and after 6 weeks of aerobic exercise training, is not sensitive to changes in endurance capacity.

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