Changes in need satisfaction and motivation orientation as predictors of psychological and behavioural outcomes in exercise referral

R.J. Rahman, C. Thogersen-Ntoumani, J. Thatcher, Jonathan Doust

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Employing Self-Determination Theory (Deci and Ryan, 1985) as a theoretical framework, this study examined psychological need satisfaction and motivational regulations as predictors of psychological and behavioural outcomes in exercise referral (ER). ER patients (N = 293; mean age 54.49) completed the measures of motivational regulations, psychological need satisfaction, health-related quality of life, life satisfaction, anxiety, depression and physical activity at entry, exit and 6 months following the end of a supervised exercise programme. Change in (Δ) intrinsic motivation during the scheme significantly predicted adherence and Δ habitual physical activity. Δ psychological need satisfaction from entry to exit significantly predicted Δ habitual physical activity from exit to 6-month follow-up. Δ psychological need satisfaction significantly predicted Δ motivational regulation and Δ psychological outcomes. Contrary to expectations, Δ self-determined regulation did not significantly predict Δ psychological outcomes during the structured part of the scheme, however, it did significantly predict Δ in psychological outcomes from exit to 6-month follow-up. These findings expand on cross-sectional research to demonstrate that psychological need satisfaction during supervised ER longitudinally predicts motivational regulation and psychological outcomes up to 6 months after a structured programme.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1521-1539
Number of pages19
JournalPsychology & Health
Volume26
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

Keywords

  • self-determination
  • quality of life
  • physical activity
  • adherence
  • health

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