Celebrity vegans and the lifestyling of ethical consumption

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Veganism offers an important critique of unethical and unsustainable food practices. Yet vegans have been largely ignored or stigmatized in mainstream media, affecting how vegans communicate about their veganism with non-vegans. Given the recent rise in prominence of vegan celebrities, this article asks, how might the cultural intermediary work of celebrity vegans make the ethics of veganism more accessible? And how do ethical concerns about the exploitative production and consumption of animals as food and by-products get reframed in the context of celebrity consumer culture? In order to answer these questions this article brings together two distinct sets of literature: on veganism and eco-feminist philosophy; and on ethical (food) consumption and celebrity culture, to provide a philosophical and theoretical framework for the analysis of two celebrity vegans - Hollywood actor, Alicia Silverstone and TV chat show host, Ellen DeGeneres. Focusing upon the educational and campaigning work of Silverstone and DeGeneres, the analysis finds that veganism is figured as a diet and lifestyle that foregrounds an ethics of care, compassion, kindness and emotion, consistent with ethical veganism. Yet these ethics are reworked through the commodity logic of celebrity culture to make it more marketable and thus consumable as a set of ideas and lifestyle practices. By downplaying the term ‘vegan’, and replacing this with ‘plant-based diet’ and ‘kindness’, potentially hostile attitudes towards veganism are circumvented. Yet, an ethical commitment that forms the basis of many vegans experiences of vegan identity is refigured through celebrity work as the individual choice to be a healthy, happy and kind self, consistent with lifestyle consumer politics. The tensions between ethical veganism as an intervention at the point of consumption within the production of exploitative human/animal/environmental relations, and the focus upon an individualised lifestyle politics through which celebrities maintain their commodity status, thus coalesce in the work of celebrity vegans.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)777-790
Number of pages14
JournalEnvironmental Communication
Volume10
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2016

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vegetarianism
VIP
moral philosophy
commodity
animal
food
food consumption
politics
chat
emotion
commitment

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Environmental Communication on 01/12/2016, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/17524032.2016.1205643

Keywords

  • celebrity
  • vegan
  • ethics
  • cultural intermediary
  • environment
  • feminism
  • climate change

Cite this

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abstract = "Veganism offers an important critique of unethical and unsustainable food practices. Yet vegans have been largely ignored or stigmatized in mainstream media, affecting how vegans communicate about their veganism with non-vegans. Given the recent rise in prominence of vegan celebrities, this article asks, how might the cultural intermediary work of celebrity vegans make the ethics of veganism more accessible? And how do ethical concerns about the exploitative production and consumption of animals as food and by-products get reframed in the context of celebrity consumer culture? In order to answer these questions this article brings together two distinct sets of literature: on veganism and eco-feminist philosophy; and on ethical (food) consumption and celebrity culture, to provide a philosophical and theoretical framework for the analysis of two celebrity vegans - Hollywood actor, Alicia Silverstone and TV chat show host, Ellen DeGeneres. Focusing upon the educational and campaigning work of Silverstone and DeGeneres, the analysis finds that veganism is figured as a diet and lifestyle that foregrounds an ethics of care, compassion, kindness and emotion, consistent with ethical veganism. Yet these ethics are reworked through the commodity logic of celebrity culture to make it more marketable and thus consumable as a set of ideas and lifestyle practices. By downplaying the term ‘vegan’, and replacing this with ‘plant-based diet’ and ‘kindness’, potentially hostile attitudes towards veganism are circumvented. Yet, an ethical commitment that forms the basis of many vegans experiences of vegan identity is refigured through celebrity work as the individual choice to be a healthy, happy and kind self, consistent with lifestyle consumer politics. The tensions between ethical veganism as an intervention at the point of consumption within the production of exploitative human/animal/environmental relations, and the focus upon an individualised lifestyle politics through which celebrities maintain their commodity status, thus coalesce in the work of celebrity vegans.",
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Celebrity vegans and the lifestyling of ethical consumption. / Doyle, Julie.

Vol. 10, No. 6, 01.12.2016, p. 777-790.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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