Action learning set meetings: getting started by ‘checking in'

Mark Hughes, Tom Bourner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This account of practice is about starting action learning set meetings. It focuses on a process sometimes known as the ‘check-in'. The paper is based upon the experience of one of the authors (Mark). It raises questions about the contribution of the check-in to an action learning set meeting and whether the checking-in process has a role in extending the ethos of action learning to other social situations. The paper concludes that the check-in serves four main roles: personal contextualisation, helping set members to step out of their professional roles, as an orientation ritual and as a means of enhancing empathy. It also concludes that checking in has a potential contribution to make to other forms of meetings and this contribution may be relevant to the broader action learning community.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-95
Number of pages7
JournalAction learning: research and practice,
Volume2
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2005

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Hughes, Mark ; Bourner, Tom. / Action learning set meetings: getting started by ‘checking in'. In: Action learning: research and practice,. 2005 ; Vol. 2, No. 1. pp. 89-95.
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Action learning set meetings: getting started by ‘checking in'. / Hughes, Mark; Bourner, Tom.

In: Action learning: research and practice, Vol. 2, No. 1, 04.2005, p. 89-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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