Visibility and Invisibility: Helen Priestman Bright Clark and the struggle for the position of women in the Society of Friends, 1873

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Women Friends (or Quakers) held an antithetical position in their religious community during thenineteenth century. They were considered to be spiritually equal to male followers, and permitted to preach in public, yet were excluded from every major decision making process concerning the religion due to their gender. This text discusses the letters published in Quaker journals in 1873 on the subject of the position of women in the Religious Society of Friends. It analyses how this correspondence played a pivotal role in making Quaker women's battle for gender equality in their religious organisation visible to a national unisex audience.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-39
Number of pages10
JournalCritical Studies
Volume2
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016

Bibliographical note

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