Transfer of care – a randomised control trial investigating the effect of sending the details of patients’ discharge medication to their community pharmacist on discharge from hospital

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: There is substantial evidence demonstrating that transferring patients between care providers is a high-risk area for medicines management. This study aimed to investigate the effect of sending patients’ hospital discharge letters to their nominated community pharmacists on the number of discrepancies between the patient’s general practitioner (GP) records and the discharge letter and between the patient’s self-described medication regime and the discharge letter. Methods: In a randomised, controlled trial, 33 participants in two groups, control and intervention, had their discharge letter sent to either their GP only or their GP and nominated community pharmacy after hospital discharge. At least 3 weeks after hospital discharge, the participant’s current GP’s medication record and their self-described medication regime was obtained. Discrepancies between their GP medication record and their discharge letter and between the participant’s self-described medication regime and their discharge letter were counted. The number of discrepancies (relative to the number of drugs pre- scribed) in the intervention group was compared with the control group for each of the above two categories, using the chi-squared test to determine the statistical significance of any differences between the two groups. Results: The intervention group had statistically fewer discrepancies than the control group for both data sets: GP records compared with the discharge letters (P < 0.0005); participants’ self-described medication regimes compared with the discharge letters (P < 0.00005). Conclusions: Sending a copy of patients’ discharge letters to their community pharmacists could be beneficial in reducing post-discharge prescribing discrepancies and improving patient understanding of the changes made to their medicines.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)174-182
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmacy Practice
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Mar 2017

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Patient Discharge
Pharmacists
General Practitioners
Control Groups
Pharmacies
Patient Care
Randomized Controlled Trials
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Hockly, M., Williams, S. and Allen, M. (2017), Transfer of care – a randomised control trial investigating the effect of sending the details of patients' discharge medication to their community pharmacist on discharge from hospital. Int J Pharm Pract. doi:10.1111/ijpp.12364, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijpp.12364/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

Cite this

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title = "Transfer of care – a randomised control trial investigating the effect of sending the details of patients’ discharge medication to their community pharmacist on discharge from hospital",
abstract = "Objective: There is substantial evidence demonstrating that transferring patients between care providers is a high-risk area for medicines management. This study aimed to investigate the effect of sending patients’ hospital discharge letters to their nominated community pharmacists on the number of discrepancies between the patient’s general practitioner (GP) records and the discharge letter and between the patient’s self-described medication regime and the discharge letter. Methods: In a randomised, controlled trial, 33 participants in two groups, control and intervention, had their discharge letter sent to either their GP only or their GP and nominated community pharmacy after hospital discharge. At least 3 weeks after hospital discharge, the participant’s current GP’s medication record and their self-described medication regime was obtained. Discrepancies between their GP medication record and their discharge letter and between the participant’s self-described medication regime and their discharge letter were counted. The number of discrepancies (relative to the number of drugs pre- scribed) in the intervention group was compared with the control group for each of the above two categories, using the chi-squared test to determine the statistical significance of any differences between the two groups. Results: The intervention group had statistically fewer discrepancies than the control group for both data sets: GP records compared with the discharge letters (P < 0.0005); participants’ self-described medication regimes compared with the discharge letters (P < 0.00005). Conclusions: Sending a copy of patients’ discharge letters to their community pharmacists could be beneficial in reducing post-discharge prescribing discrepancies and improving patient understanding of the changes made to their medicines.",
author = "Megan Hockly and Sian Williams and Marcus Allen",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Hockly, M., Williams, S. and Allen, M. (2017), Transfer of care – a randomised control trial investigating the effect of sending the details of patients' discharge medication to their community pharmacist on discharge from hospital. Int J Pharm Pract. doi:10.1111/ijpp.12364, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijpp.12364/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.",
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AU - Hockly, Megan

AU - Williams, Sian

AU - Allen, Marcus

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Hockly, M., Williams, S. and Allen, M. (2017), Transfer of care – a randomised control trial investigating the effect of sending the details of patients' discharge medication to their community pharmacist on discharge from hospital. Int J Pharm Pract. doi:10.1111/ijpp.12364, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ijpp.12364/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

PY - 2017/3/27

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N2 - Objective: There is substantial evidence demonstrating that transferring patients between care providers is a high-risk area for medicines management. This study aimed to investigate the effect of sending patients’ hospital discharge letters to their nominated community pharmacists on the number of discrepancies between the patient’s general practitioner (GP) records and the discharge letter and between the patient’s self-described medication regime and the discharge letter. Methods: In a randomised, controlled trial, 33 participants in two groups, control and intervention, had their discharge letter sent to either their GP only or their GP and nominated community pharmacy after hospital discharge. At least 3 weeks after hospital discharge, the participant’s current GP’s medication record and their self-described medication regime was obtained. Discrepancies between their GP medication record and their discharge letter and between the participant’s self-described medication regime and their discharge letter were counted. The number of discrepancies (relative to the number of drugs pre- scribed) in the intervention group was compared with the control group for each of the above two categories, using the chi-squared test to determine the statistical significance of any differences between the two groups. Results: The intervention group had statistically fewer discrepancies than the control group for both data sets: GP records compared with the discharge letters (P < 0.0005); participants’ self-described medication regimes compared with the discharge letters (P < 0.00005). Conclusions: Sending a copy of patients’ discharge letters to their community pharmacists could be beneficial in reducing post-discharge prescribing discrepancies and improving patient understanding of the changes made to their medicines.

AB - Objective: There is substantial evidence demonstrating that transferring patients between care providers is a high-risk area for medicines management. This study aimed to investigate the effect of sending patients’ hospital discharge letters to their nominated community pharmacists on the number of discrepancies between the patient’s general practitioner (GP) records and the discharge letter and between the patient’s self-described medication regime and the discharge letter. Methods: In a randomised, controlled trial, 33 participants in two groups, control and intervention, had their discharge letter sent to either their GP only or their GP and nominated community pharmacy after hospital discharge. At least 3 weeks after hospital discharge, the participant’s current GP’s medication record and their self-described medication regime was obtained. Discrepancies between their GP medication record and their discharge letter and between the participant’s self-described medication regime and their discharge letter were counted. The number of discrepancies (relative to the number of drugs pre- scribed) in the intervention group was compared with the control group for each of the above two categories, using the chi-squared test to determine the statistical significance of any differences between the two groups. Results: The intervention group had statistically fewer discrepancies than the control group for both data sets: GP records compared with the discharge letters (P < 0.0005); participants’ self-described medication regimes compared with the discharge letters (P < 0.00005). Conclusions: Sending a copy of patients’ discharge letters to their community pharmacists could be beneficial in reducing post-discharge prescribing discrepancies and improving patient understanding of the changes made to their medicines.

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