Training to teach physical education in an opposite-sex secondary school: a qualitative analysis of trainee teachers’ experiences

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study focuses on the school-based training experiences of trainee physical education teachers in opposite-sex secondary schools in south-east England which has been presented and discussed elsewhere in the academic community (Stidder, 2010a; 2010b; 2010c). Through an interpretive paradigm, using critical incident writing as a means of collecting computer-mediated data, one male and two female trainee teachers of physical education provided continuous commentaries of their professional development within an opposite-sex secondary school over a seventy-five day training period. The three trainee physical education teachers in this study believed that professional integrity and pedagogical competence (being good at their job) was more important than issues associated with their biological sex. It is suggested, that the findings from this study could stimulate professional debate with regards to training policies in secondary school physical education. Such debate and actions following from an informed examination of policy could increase the subject knowledge, employment prospects, occupational mobility and professional development of trainee physical education teachers.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)346-360
Number of pages15
JournalEuropean Physical Education Review
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2012

Bibliographical note

© 2012 SAGE Publications & The Author(s)

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