Training perceptions, engagement and performance: comparing personal role engagement and work engagement constructs

Luke Fletcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare two engagement constructs (work engagement and personal role engagement) with regards to their relationship with training perceptions and work role performance behaviours. It was hypothesised that personal role engagement would show incremental validity above that of work engagement at predicting work role performance behaviours and be a stronger mediator of the relationships between training perceptions and such behaviours. Questionnaire data was gathered from 304 full-time working adults in the UK. As predicted, personal role engagement was found to explain additional variance above that of work engagement for task proficiency, task adaptability, and task proactivity behaviours. Moreover, personal role engagement was a stronger mediator of the relationship between training perceptions and task proficiency as well as between training perceptions and task adaptability. Both work engagement and personal role engagement mediated the relationship between training perceptions and task proactivity to a similar degree. The findings suggest that personal role engagement has better practical utility to the HRD domain than work engagement, and indicates that future research may benefit from adopting the personal role engagement construct.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4-26
Number of pages23
JournalHuman Resource Development International
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Human Resource Development International on 20/07/2015, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13678868.2015.1067855

Keywords

  • training and development
  • work engagement
  • personal role engagement
  • performance

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