The self-control ethos and the 'chav': unpacking cultural representations of the white working class

Matthew Adams, Jayne Raisborough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper applies Joffe and Staerkle´’s self-control ethos to cultural representations of the white working class. We initially follow their identification of three aspects of the self-control ethos – mind, body, and destiny – to show the explanatory value of the concept, before considering four possible avenues through which the self-control ethos may be developed: the extent to which it is the interrelationship between the separate aspects of the self-control ethos which lends them their visceral, emotional, and symbolic power; that gender differentiation is an important element in the specific content of stereotypes; that some stereotype content relates to issues of containment; and that a tighter contextualization is afforded to the self-control ethos by considering self and other relations in the terms of a consumer culture. These are offered as possible directions for the future development of a social representational approach sensitive to the contemporary cultural context.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)81-97
Number of pages17
JournalCulture & Psychology
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Bibliographical note

© 2011 Sage Publications

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The self-control ethos and the 'chav': unpacking cultural representations of the white working class'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this