The long-term outcomes from a randomized controlled trial of an educational–behavioural joint protection programme for people with rheumatoid arthritis

A. Hammond, K. Freeman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the long-term effects of joint protection on health status of people with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Design: A four-year follow-up of a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded trial was conducted.Setting: Two rheumatology outpatient departments.Participants: People with rheumatoid arthritis less than five years since diagnosis.Interventions: Two 8-hour interventions were originally compared: a standard arthritis education programme, including 2½ hours of joint protection based on typical UK occupational therapy practice (plus 5½ hours on RA, exercise, pain management, diet and foot care); and a joint protection programme, using educational–behavioural training.Main measures: Adherence to joint protection, pain, hand pain on activity, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales 2 and Arthritis Self-efficacy were recorded at 0 and 4 years.Results: Sixty-five people attended the joint protection and 62 the standard programmes. Groups at entry were similar in age (51 years; 49 years), disease duration (21 months: 17.5 months) and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and disease-modifying drugs. At four years, the joint protection group continued to have significantly better: joint protection adherence (p = 0.001); early morning stiffness (p = 0.01); AIMS2 activities of daily living (ADL) scores (p = 0.04) compared with the standard group. The joint protection group also had significantly fewer hand deformities: metacarpophalangeal (MCP) (p = 0.02) and wrist joints (p = 0.04).Conclusion: Attending an educational-behavioural joint protection programme significantly improves joint protection adherence and maintains functional ability long term. This approach is more effective than standard methods of training and should be more widely adopted.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)520-528
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Rehabilitation
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2004

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Rheumatoid Arthritis
Randomized Controlled Trials
Joints
Arthritis
Hand Deformities
Wrist Joint
Aptitude
Occupational Therapy
Arthralgia
Rheumatology
Self Efficacy
Pain Management
Activities of Daily Living
Health Status
Foot
Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Outpatients
Hand
Exercise
Diet

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: To evaluate the long-term effects of joint protection on health status of people with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Design: A four-year follow-up of a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded trial was conducted.Setting: Two rheumatology outpatient departments.Participants: People with rheumatoid arthritis less than five years since diagnosis.Interventions: Two 8-hour interventions were originally compared: a standard arthritis education programme, including 2½ hours of joint protection based on typical UK occupational therapy practice (plus 5½ hours on RA, exercise, pain management, diet and foot care); and a joint protection programme, using educational–behavioural training.Main measures: Adherence to joint protection, pain, hand pain on activity, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales 2 and Arthritis Self-efficacy were recorded at 0 and 4 years.Results: Sixty-five people attended the joint protection and 62 the standard programmes. Groups at entry were similar in age (51 years; 49 years), disease duration (21 months: 17.5 months) and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and disease-modifying drugs. At four years, the joint protection group continued to have significantly better: joint protection adherence (p = 0.001); early morning stiffness (p = 0.01); AIMS2 activities of daily living (ADL) scores (p = 0.04) compared with the standard group. The joint protection group also had significantly fewer hand deformities: metacarpophalangeal (MCP) (p = 0.02) and wrist joints (p = 0.04).Conclusion: Attending an educational-behavioural joint protection programme significantly improves joint protection adherence and maintains functional ability long term. This approach is more effective than standard methods of training and should be more widely adopted.",
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The long-term outcomes from a randomized controlled trial of an educational–behavioural joint protection programme for people with rheumatoid arthritis. / Hammond, A.; Freeman, K.

In: Clinical Rehabilitation, Vol. 18, No. 5, 08.2004, p. 520-528.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Objective: To evaluate the long-term effects of joint protection on health status of people with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Design: A four-year follow-up of a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded trial was conducted.Setting: Two rheumatology outpatient departments.Participants: People with rheumatoid arthritis less than five years since diagnosis.Interventions: Two 8-hour interventions were originally compared: a standard arthritis education programme, including 2½ hours of joint protection based on typical UK occupational therapy practice (plus 5½ hours on RA, exercise, pain management, diet and foot care); and a joint protection programme, using educational–behavioural training.Main measures: Adherence to joint protection, pain, hand pain on activity, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales 2 and Arthritis Self-efficacy were recorded at 0 and 4 years.Results: Sixty-five people attended the joint protection and 62 the standard programmes. Groups at entry were similar in age (51 years; 49 years), disease duration (21 months: 17.5 months) and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and disease-modifying drugs. At four years, the joint protection group continued to have significantly better: joint protection adherence (p = 0.001); early morning stiffness (p = 0.01); AIMS2 activities of daily living (ADL) scores (p = 0.04) compared with the standard group. The joint protection group also had significantly fewer hand deformities: metacarpophalangeal (MCP) (p = 0.02) and wrist joints (p = 0.04).Conclusion: Attending an educational-behavioural joint protection programme significantly improves joint protection adherence and maintains functional ability long term. This approach is more effective than standard methods of training and should be more widely adopted.

AB - Objective: To evaluate the long-term effects of joint protection on health status of people with early rheumatoid arthritis (RA).Design: A four-year follow-up of a randomized, controlled, assessor-blinded trial was conducted.Setting: Two rheumatology outpatient departments.Participants: People with rheumatoid arthritis less than five years since diagnosis.Interventions: Two 8-hour interventions were originally compared: a standard arthritis education programme, including 2½ hours of joint protection based on typical UK occupational therapy practice (plus 5½ hours on RA, exercise, pain management, diet and foot care); and a joint protection programme, using educational–behavioural training.Main measures: Adherence to joint protection, pain, hand pain on activity, Arthritis Impact Measurement Scales 2 and Arthritis Self-efficacy were recorded at 0 and 4 years.Results: Sixty-five people attended the joint protection and 62 the standard programmes. Groups at entry were similar in age (51 years; 49 years), disease duration (21 months: 17.5 months) and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory and disease-modifying drugs. At four years, the joint protection group continued to have significantly better: joint protection adherence (p = 0.001); early morning stiffness (p = 0.01); AIMS2 activities of daily living (ADL) scores (p = 0.04) compared with the standard group. The joint protection group also had significantly fewer hand deformities: metacarpophalangeal (MCP) (p = 0.02) and wrist joints (p = 0.04).Conclusion: Attending an educational-behavioural joint protection programme significantly improves joint protection adherence and maintains functional ability long term. This approach is more effective than standard methods of training and should be more widely adopted.

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