The journey to becoming a graduate nurse: a study of the lived experience of part-time post-registration students

Helen Stanley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Following a period of dissatisfaction with the current provision of continuing professional education (CPE) in nursing, the ENB Higher Award/ BSc (Hons) Professional Practice was developed. This phenomenological study investigated the lived experience of nine students on this course, exploring the impact of a part-time modular post-registration degree on their personal and professional lives. Taped unstructured interviews were used to collect data. The analytical process revealed that their experiences could be symbolised as a journey consisting of four key themes: the traveller, the guide, the journey, and journey’s end. Areas such as motivation, the impact of education on individuals, and linking theory to practice were found to be part of a complex web of variables influenced by the individual, their workplace, managers and colleagues, and personal tutor. The personal and professional changes experienced were often stressful and they utilised many support networks, including their tutor, family and work colleagues, to gain success. However, some failed to have any recognition of their new skills and knowledge. Recommendations included further research into the value and function of post-registration degrees, the learning environment for post-registration nurses, and links between CPE and the quality of patient care.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)62-71
Number of pages10
JournalNurse Education in Practice
Volume3
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2003

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patient care
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Cite this

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The journey to becoming a graduate nurse: a study of the lived experience of part-time post-registration students. / Stanley, Helen.

In: Nurse Education in Practice, Vol. 3, No. 2, 06.2003, p. 62-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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