The human occupational impact of partner and close family caregiving in dementia: a meta-synthesis of the qualitative research, using a bespoke quality appraisal tool

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: In 2009, the United Kingdom Department of Health identified the need to assist families so that people with dementia can remain living at home. Occupational therapists could support families and their loved ones at home by understanding the human occupational impact of caregiving. This impact includes how one is influenced by values and motivated to perform activities shaped by experiences and life roles. The purpose of this review was to synthesize qualitative research related to family dementia caregiving, extrapolating information about the human occupational impact on the caregiver. The aim was to inform occupational therapy practice. Method: A search was conducted across a range of electronic databases. A quality appraisal tool was specifically developed for the study appraisal and data extraction process. Data were extracted and analysed within the Model of Human Occupation framework. Findings: Twenty studies were included in this review. Five themes emerged: adapting to dementia; staying motivated and in control; preserving occupational balance and wellbeing; gaining meaning from the caregiver role; and losses and burden. Conclusion: The human occupational impact of caregiving affects the quality and decision-making of care for families. Occupational therapists are well placed to support families through the stages of dementia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)410-421
Number of pages12
JournalBritish journal of occupational therapy
Volume77
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2014

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