The Effect of Skill Level, Advance Cues, and Response Mode on Pre-Stroke Movements in Simulated Cricket-Batting: International Convention on Science, Medicine in Sport, Glasgow

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: The capability of simulated sporting tasks to capture expertise in anticipation skill has been the focus of recent research. The degrees to which the visual perceptual information and the mode of action correspond to the natural task are thought to be important in capturing expertise. However, more precise information about this correspondence is lacking. First we aimed to confirm our simulated batting task could discriminate between skilled and novice batters. Second, we examined the effect of response mode on the batting performance Methodology: 13 skilled and 12 novice male right handed batsmen were recruited to take part in this laboratory study under ball-release occlusion and un-occluded conditions. Response mode was tested during separate trials under either natural (full cricket shot) or un-natural (key-press) modes. Direction and magnitude of foot movements were recorded to bowler deliveries that bounced 0-14 m from the batsmen in the natural condition while direction of response was recorded in the un-natural condition. Results: Significant differences were found between skilled vs. novice directions and magnitudes across most of the delivery lengths. Significant correlations found between skilled occluded vs. un-occluded foot movement transitions, significant differences were found between skilled occluded vs. un-occluded foot movement directions and magnitudes across selected delivery lengths. No significant correlations found between novice occluded vs. un-occluded movement magnitudes and directions. No significant differences were found between skilled natural vs. un-natural response modes across most delivery lengths. Significant differences were found between novice natural vs. un-natural response modes. Conclusion: Skilled batsmen are able to anticipate a bowler’s intention compared to novices, but are unable to maintain the magnitude of movement responses, while novices do. Response modes don’t affect skilled, but novice performance with un-natural responses provoking representative chance level results.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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