The criminalisation of squatting: Discourses, moral panics and resistances in the Netherlands, England and Wales

Deanna Dadusc, E.T.C. Dee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNChapterResearch

Abstract

In both England and the Netherlands, squatting has recently been legislated against. Criminalisation is often understood as a top-down process, where those who are criminalised are seen as passive actors without political agency. Understanding squatters as political activists, rather than merely victims of the social and economic system, puts a different light on the theoretical and practical implications related to criminalisation. Indeed criminalisation is a complex process that involves a multiplicity of actors, interests, and discourses. On the one hand it produces new norms and meanings aimed at shaping squatters' conducts. On the other hand, it sees the emergence of alternative practices and discourses that resist criminalisation. The aim of this paper is the understanding of the complex relation between criminalisation and its resistance, and of how discourses of criminalisation and practices of resistance mutually influence each other. We will examine the contestation of the meaning of squatting, the role of the media in constructing moral panics toward squatting, and the alternative discourses used to counter criminalisation, both in England and in the Netherlands. In particular, we will explore the discourses mobilised by right-wing politicians and opponents of squatting to criminalise it, and the discourses utilised by squatters and their supporters to defend it.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMoral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons?
EditorsL. O'Mahony, D. O'Mahony, R. Hickey
Place of PublicationNew York
Pages109-132
Number of pages24
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015

Fingerprint

criminalization
Netherlands
discourse
squatter
political actor
economic system
social system
politician

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Moral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons? on 28/10/2014, available online: https://www.routledge.com/Moral-Rhetoric-and-the-Criminalisation-of-Squatting-Vulnerable-Demons/Fox-OMahony-OMahony-Hickey/p/book/9780415740616

Keywords

  • Criminalisation
  • squatting
  • critical discourse analysis
  • social movements
  • moral panic
  • resistance

Cite this

Dadusc, D., & Dee, E. T. C. (2015). The criminalisation of squatting: Discourses, moral panics and resistances in the Netherlands, England and Wales. In L. O'Mahony, D. O'Mahony, & R. Hickey (Eds.), Moral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons? (pp. 109-132). New York.
Dadusc, Deanna ; Dee, E.T.C. / The criminalisation of squatting: Discourses, moral panics and resistances in the Netherlands, England and Wales. Moral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons?. editor / L. O'Mahony ; D. O'Mahony ; R. Hickey. New York, 2015. pp. 109-132
@inbook{dd643ac755c54e19b12ee561ab0ae08a,
title = "The criminalisation of squatting: Discourses, moral panics and resistances in the Netherlands, England and Wales",
abstract = "In both England and the Netherlands, squatting has recently been legislated against. Criminalisation is often understood as a top-down process, where those who are criminalised are seen as passive actors without political agency. Understanding squatters as political activists, rather than merely victims of the social and economic system, puts a different light on the theoretical and practical implications related to criminalisation. Indeed criminalisation is a complex process that involves a multiplicity of actors, interests, and discourses. On the one hand it produces new norms and meanings aimed at shaping squatters' conducts. On the other hand, it sees the emergence of alternative practices and discourses that resist criminalisation. The aim of this paper is the understanding of the complex relation between criminalisation and its resistance, and of how discourses of criminalisation and practices of resistance mutually influence each other. We will examine the contestation of the meaning of squatting, the role of the media in constructing moral panics toward squatting, and the alternative discourses used to counter criminalisation, both in England and in the Netherlands. In particular, we will explore the discourses mobilised by right-wing politicians and opponents of squatting to criminalise it, and the discourses utilised by squatters and their supporters to defend it.",
keywords = "Criminalisation, squatting, critical discourse analysis, social movements, moral panic, resistance",
author = "Deanna Dadusc and E.T.C. Dee",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Moral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons? on 28/10/2014, available online: https://www.routledge.com/Moral-Rhetoric-and-the-Criminalisation-of-Squatting-Vulnerable-Demons/Fox-OMahony-OMahony-Hickey/p/book/9780415740616",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781322232263",
pages = "109--132",
editor = "L. O'Mahony and D. O'Mahony and R. Hickey",
booktitle = "Moral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons?",

}

Dadusc, D & Dee, ETC 2015, The criminalisation of squatting: Discourses, moral panics and resistances in the Netherlands, England and Wales. in L O'Mahony, D O'Mahony & R Hickey (eds), Moral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons?. New York, pp. 109-132.

The criminalisation of squatting: Discourses, moral panics and resistances in the Netherlands, England and Wales. / Dadusc, Deanna; Dee, E.T.C.

Moral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons?. ed. / L. O'Mahony; D. O'Mahony; R. Hickey. New York, 2015. p. 109-132.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNChapterResearch

TY - CHAP

T1 - The criminalisation of squatting: Discourses, moral panics and resistances in the Netherlands, England and Wales

AU - Dadusc, Deanna

AU - Dee, E.T.C.

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Moral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons? on 28/10/2014, available online: https://www.routledge.com/Moral-Rhetoric-and-the-Criminalisation-of-Squatting-Vulnerable-Demons/Fox-OMahony-OMahony-Hickey/p/book/9780415740616

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - In both England and the Netherlands, squatting has recently been legislated against. Criminalisation is often understood as a top-down process, where those who are criminalised are seen as passive actors without political agency. Understanding squatters as political activists, rather than merely victims of the social and economic system, puts a different light on the theoretical and practical implications related to criminalisation. Indeed criminalisation is a complex process that involves a multiplicity of actors, interests, and discourses. On the one hand it produces new norms and meanings aimed at shaping squatters' conducts. On the other hand, it sees the emergence of alternative practices and discourses that resist criminalisation. The aim of this paper is the understanding of the complex relation between criminalisation and its resistance, and of how discourses of criminalisation and practices of resistance mutually influence each other. We will examine the contestation of the meaning of squatting, the role of the media in constructing moral panics toward squatting, and the alternative discourses used to counter criminalisation, both in England and in the Netherlands. In particular, we will explore the discourses mobilised by right-wing politicians and opponents of squatting to criminalise it, and the discourses utilised by squatters and their supporters to defend it.

AB - In both England and the Netherlands, squatting has recently been legislated against. Criminalisation is often understood as a top-down process, where those who are criminalised are seen as passive actors without political agency. Understanding squatters as political activists, rather than merely victims of the social and economic system, puts a different light on the theoretical and practical implications related to criminalisation. Indeed criminalisation is a complex process that involves a multiplicity of actors, interests, and discourses. On the one hand it produces new norms and meanings aimed at shaping squatters' conducts. On the other hand, it sees the emergence of alternative practices and discourses that resist criminalisation. The aim of this paper is the understanding of the complex relation between criminalisation and its resistance, and of how discourses of criminalisation and practices of resistance mutually influence each other. We will examine the contestation of the meaning of squatting, the role of the media in constructing moral panics toward squatting, and the alternative discourses used to counter criminalisation, both in England and in the Netherlands. In particular, we will explore the discourses mobilised by right-wing politicians and opponents of squatting to criminalise it, and the discourses utilised by squatters and their supporters to defend it.

KW - Criminalisation

KW - squatting

KW - critical discourse analysis

KW - social movements

KW - moral panic

KW - resistance

M3 - Chapter

SN - 9781322232263

SP - 109

EP - 132

BT - Moral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons?

A2 - O'Mahony, L.

A2 - O'Mahony, D.

A2 - Hickey, R.

CY - New York

ER -

Dadusc D, Dee ETC. The criminalisation of squatting: Discourses, moral panics and resistances in the Netherlands, England and Wales. In O'Mahony L, O'Mahony D, Hickey R, editors, Moral rhetoric and the criminalisation of squatting: vulnerable demons?. New York. 2015. p. 109-132