The application of the critical power construct to endurance exercise

K. McGawley

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Abstract

Critical power (CP) is a theoretical construct reflecting the highest work rate that can be maintained by continuous aerobic energy resynthesis for an infinite period of time. In practice, however, the CP estimate derived from mathematical modelling usually leads to exhaustion within 1 h. While previous research has used traditional measures of aerobic fitness to validate CP, there is disagreement in the literature as to whether CP reflects a physiological steady or a non-steady state. Furthermore, the practical applications of the CP construct have received limited research attention. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis was to clarify the applicability of CP to endurance exercise.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • University of Brighton
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2010

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endurance
mathematical modeling
fitness
energy

Bibliographical note

Copyright © and Moral Rights for this thesis are retained by the author and/or other copyright owners.

Cite this

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title = "The application of the critical power construct to endurance exercise",
abstract = "Critical power (CP) is a theoretical construct reflecting the highest work rate that can be maintained by continuous aerobic energy resynthesis for an infinite period of time. In practice, however, the CP estimate derived from mathematical modelling usually leads to exhaustion within 1 h. While previous research has used traditional measures of aerobic fitness to validate CP, there is disagreement in the literature as to whether CP reflects a physiological steady or a non-steady state. Furthermore, the practical applications of the CP construct have received limited research attention. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis was to clarify the applicability of CP to endurance exercise.",
author = "K. McGawley",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} and Moral Rights for this thesis are retained by the author and/or other copyright owners.",
year = "2010",
month = "9",
language = "English",
school = "University of Brighton",

}

McGawley, K 2010, 'The application of the critical power construct to endurance exercise', Doctor of Philosophy, University of Brighton.

The application of the critical power construct to endurance exercise. / McGawley, K.

2010. 242 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

TY - THES

T1 - The application of the critical power construct to endurance exercise

AU - McGawley, K.

N1 - Copyright © and Moral Rights for this thesis are retained by the author and/or other copyright owners.

PY - 2010/9

Y1 - 2010/9

N2 - Critical power (CP) is a theoretical construct reflecting the highest work rate that can be maintained by continuous aerobic energy resynthesis for an infinite period of time. In practice, however, the CP estimate derived from mathematical modelling usually leads to exhaustion within 1 h. While previous research has used traditional measures of aerobic fitness to validate CP, there is disagreement in the literature as to whether CP reflects a physiological steady or a non-steady state. Furthermore, the practical applications of the CP construct have received limited research attention. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis was to clarify the applicability of CP to endurance exercise.

AB - Critical power (CP) is a theoretical construct reflecting the highest work rate that can be maintained by continuous aerobic energy resynthesis for an infinite period of time. In practice, however, the CP estimate derived from mathematical modelling usually leads to exhaustion within 1 h. While previous research has used traditional measures of aerobic fitness to validate CP, there is disagreement in the literature as to whether CP reflects a physiological steady or a non-steady state. Furthermore, the practical applications of the CP construct have received limited research attention. Therefore, the purpose of this thesis was to clarify the applicability of CP to endurance exercise.

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -