The application of a recently isolated strain of bacteroides (GB-124) to identify human sources of faecal pollution in a temperate river catchment

James Ebdon, M. Muniesa, Huw Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Recent work has suggested that bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides are a potential tool for faecal source tracking, but that different host strains may be needed for different geographic areas. This study used a recently identified strain of Bacteroides (GB-124) to detect human sources of faecal pollution in a river catchment in southeast England (UK). A total of 306 river water, municipal wastewater and animal samples were obtained over a 16-month period. Bacteriophages capable of infecting GB-124 were present in all municipal wastewaters but were not detected in faecal samples from animals, and were detected at significantly lower levels (P< 0.001) in river waters directly downstream of a dairy farm. This last observation was despite the presence of high levels of faecal indicator bacteria at this site. The study suggests that GB-124 appears to be specific to human faeces. As such it may represent an effective and low-cost method of faecal source identification.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3683-3690
Number of pages8
JournalWater Research
Volume41
Issue number16
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2007

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bacteriophage
river water
catchment
wastewater
pollution
animal
river
feces
bacterium
cost
indicator
dairy farm
method

Cite this

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title = "The application of a recently isolated strain of bacteroides (GB-124) to identify human sources of faecal pollution in a temperate river catchment",
abstract = "Recent work has suggested that bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides are a potential tool for faecal source tracking, but that different host strains may be needed for different geographic areas. This study used a recently identified strain of Bacteroides (GB-124) to detect human sources of faecal pollution in a river catchment in southeast England (UK). A total of 306 river water, municipal wastewater and animal samples were obtained over a 16-month period. Bacteriophages capable of infecting GB-124 were present in all municipal wastewaters but were not detected in faecal samples from animals, and were detected at significantly lower levels (P< 0.001) in river waters directly downstream of a dairy farm. This last observation was despite the presence of high levels of faecal indicator bacteria at this site. The study suggests that GB-124 appears to be specific to human faeces. As such it may represent an effective and low-cost method of faecal source identification.",
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The application of a recently isolated strain of bacteroides (GB-124) to identify human sources of faecal pollution in a temperate river catchment. / Ebdon, James; Muniesa, M.; Taylor, Huw.

In: Water Research, Vol. 41, No. 16, 07.2007, p. 3683-3690.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Recent work has suggested that bacteriophages infecting Bacteroides are a potential tool for faecal source tracking, but that different host strains may be needed for different geographic areas. This study used a recently identified strain of Bacteroides (GB-124) to detect human sources of faecal pollution in a river catchment in southeast England (UK). A total of 306 river water, municipal wastewater and animal samples were obtained over a 16-month period. Bacteriophages capable of infecting GB-124 were present in all municipal wastewaters but were not detected in faecal samples from animals, and were detected at significantly lower levels (P< 0.001) in river waters directly downstream of a dairy farm. This last observation was despite the presence of high levels of faecal indicator bacteria at this site. The study suggests that GB-124 appears to be specific to human faeces. As such it may represent an effective and low-cost method of faecal source identification.

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