The allotment in the restaurant: the paradox of foodie austerity and changing food values

Abigail Wincott

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNChapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the apparently paradoxical phenomenon of foodie austerity in the British media. This is not ‘austerity’ defined as cuts to public services but it certainly resonates in the current climate of belt-tightening and fiscal prudence. Foodie austerity is part of a much wider movement born of dissatisfaction with modern food systems, which embraces the rediscovery and safeguarding of tradition and a turning away from mass production, from excess and convenience. Its proponents extol the simple pleasures of home-grown, home-cooked food and the rediscovery of homely dishes ‘rustled up’ from store cupboard ingredients and left-overs. There are claims it offers liberation from poverty and independence from corporations. But this study of lifestyle articles and readers’ comments ‘below the line’ shows the same themes and assumptions underlying frugal foodyism are directed very differently between lifestyle tips for affluent readers, and the rather unforgiving advice aimed at the poor, in the comments section.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPopular culture and the austerity myth: hard times today
EditorsP. Bennett, J. McDougall
Place of PublicationAbingdon
PublisherRoutledge
Pages28-41
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)9781138942943
Publication statusPublished - 10 Nov 2016

Publication series

NameResearch in Cultural and Media Studies

Bibliographical note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of a book chapter published by Routledge in Popular culture and the austerity myth: hard times today on 10/11/2016, available online: https://www.routledge.com/Popular-Culture-and-the-Austerity-Myth-Hard-Times-Today/Bennett-McDougall/p/book/9781138942943

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