Storying the world: a posthumanist critique of phenomenological-humanist representational practices in mental health nurse qualitative inquiry

Alec Grant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to build on my previously published critique of phenomenological-humanist representational practices in mental health nursing qualitative inquiry. I will unpack and trouble these practices from an explicitly posthumanist philosophical position on the basis of seminal posthumanist texts and my own single- and co-authored work. My argument will be that researchers in mental health nurse qualitative inquiry, who display a phenomenological-humanist narrative bent in their writing, continually endorse the validity of the institutional psychiatric assumptions, practices and ways of representing human psychological distress. These are all explicitly rejected in more critical forms of qualitative inquiry in mental health, including in my own work. I will conclude that the use of phenomenological-humanist representational practices, in mental health nursing and by implication and extension other healthcare disciplines, is un-ethical, un-empathic and morally compromised. This is because such practices present accounts of the worlds of mental health service users, survivors and carers that lack necessary and sufficient levels of criticality and context.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)290-297
Number of pages8
JournalNursing Philosophy
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jun 2016

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mental health
nursing
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Bibliographical note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Grant, A. J. (2016), Storying the world: a posthumanist critique of phenomenological-humanist representational practices in mental health nurse qualitative inquiry. Nursing Philosophy, 17(4), 290-297, which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/nup.12135/abstract. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

Keywords

  • narrative ethics
  • mental health
  • nursing
  • phenomenology
  • qualitative research
  • narrative

Cite this

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Storying the world: a posthumanist critique of phenomenological-humanist representational practices in mental health nurse qualitative inquiry. / Grant, Alec.

In: Nursing Philosophy, Vol. 17, No. 4, 12.06.2016, p. 290-297.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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