Retracing Heinrich Barth at the Brunei Gallery, SOAS: using digital technologies to support exhibition development and encourage visitor participation

Julia Winckler, Erminia Carillo, Karina Rodriguez Echavarria, Lyn Pemberton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBNResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The 19th century German explorer Heinrich Barth was one of the first Europeans to recognise the significance and richness of African history and culture. Travelling under the Arabic name Abd el Kerim, he crossed the Sahara desert, over the Air Mountains and into Central Africa, keeping accurate records of his journey. Inspired by Barth's account and fired by tales of a mysterious room containing a trove of ancient artefacts connected to Barth's expedition, artist Julia Winckler journeyed to Niger in 2005. Upon her return, her experience was recorded in an interactive multimedia website, which presented content and narratives from the journey. This paper will present the development of a resulting photographic exhibition at the Brunei Gallery. Through interdisciplinary collaboration, a range of digital and non-digital information, artefacts and technologies were used both to desgin the photographic exhibition and to encourage visitor participation. The paper also reflects on the functionality and successes of these strategies based on informal feedback and observation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe 9th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage
Pages97-102
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 2008
EventThe 9th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage -
Duration: 1 Jan 2008 → …

Conference

ConferenceThe 9th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage
Period1/01/08 → …

Fingerprint

Brunei Gallery
Journey
Digital Technology
Participation
Artifact
Artist
Air
African Culture
Central Africa
Names
Niger
Expedition
Multimedia
Functionality
African History
Sahara
Interdisciplinary Collaboration
Mountains
Web Sites

Cite this

Winckler, J., Carillo, E., Rodriguez Echavarria, K., & Pemberton, L. (2008). Retracing Heinrich Barth at the Brunei Gallery, SOAS: using digital technologies to support exhibition development and encourage visitor participation. In The 9th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage (pp. 97-102)
Winckler, Julia ; Carillo, Erminia ; Rodriguez Echavarria, Karina ; Pemberton, Lyn. / Retracing Heinrich Barth at the Brunei Gallery, SOAS: using digital technologies to support exhibition development and encourage visitor participation. The 9th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage. 2008. pp. 97-102
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Winckler, J, Carillo, E, Rodriguez Echavarria, K & Pemberton, L 2008, Retracing Heinrich Barth at the Brunei Gallery, SOAS: using digital technologies to support exhibition development and encourage visitor participation. in The 9th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage. pp. 97-102, The 9th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage, 1/01/08.

Retracing Heinrich Barth at the Brunei Gallery, SOAS: using digital technologies to support exhibition development and encourage visitor participation. / Winckler, Julia; Carillo, Erminia; Rodriguez Echavarria, Karina; Pemberton, Lyn.

The 9th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage. 2008. p. 97-102.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNConference contribution with ISSN or ISBNResearchpeer-review

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Winckler J, Carillo E, Rodriguez Echavarria K, Pemberton L. Retracing Heinrich Barth at the Brunei Gallery, SOAS: using digital technologies to support exhibition development and encourage visitor participation. In The 9th International Symposium on Virtual Reality, Archaeology, and Cultural Heritage. 2008. p. 97-102