Practising care in teenage mother support groups

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article draws on two qualitative research projects with teenage parents and examines their use of support groups. It argues that group-based programmes such as the ones discussed here convey particular advantages in providing support for young parents which may not be possible in a one-to-one context. These include peer learning, the development of friendships as a form of social support and respite. The article argues, however, that for these potentials to be realised, an underpinning ethic of care is required. Using Joan Tronto’s four phases of care (caring about, caring for, caregiving and care receiving) and their concomitant elements (attentiveness, responsibility, competence and responsiveness) the practices of the group leaders in providing support are analysed. The article concludes by arguing that ‘writing in’ an ethic of care approach to policies designed to support teenage parents would be beneficial for service provision.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalCritical Social Policy
Volume35
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 13 Aug 2015

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parents
Group
moral philosophy
caregiving
friendship
qualitative research
social support
research project
leader
responsibility
learning

Keywords

  • Ethic of care
  • peer support
  • social support
  • teenage parenting

Cite this

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abstract = "This article draws on two qualitative research projects with teenage parents and examines their use of support groups. It argues that group-based programmes such as the ones discussed here convey particular advantages in providing support for young parents which may not be possible in a one-to-one context. These include peer learning, the development of friendships as a form of social support and respite. The article argues, however, that for these potentials to be realised, an underpinning ethic of care is required. Using Joan Tronto’s four phases of care (caring about, caring for, caregiving and care receiving) and their concomitant elements (attentiveness, responsibility, competence and responsiveness) the practices of the group leaders in providing support are analysed. The article concludes by arguing that ‘writing in’ an ethic of care approach to policies designed to support teenage parents would be beneficial for service provision.",
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Practising care in teenage mother support groups. / Ellis-Sloan, Kyla.

In: Critical Social Policy, Vol. 35, No. 4, 13.08.2015, p. 1-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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