Poster Girl: series of prints exploring fetish and erotica

Research output: Non-textual outputExhibition

Abstract

Through illustration, Goodall’s research questions the constructions of erotic art and how these might be rethought through concepts of masking, desire, fetish fashion and dressing-up. Goodall builds on the work of cartoonists such as Eric Stanton, photographer and illustrator John Willie, and artists such as Allen Jones, to challenge the border between pop art and erotica, and to develop a series of works that explore fantasy, myth and reality. In so doing he creates a visual and critical commentary on perceptions of erotic art, while maintaining the archetypes that construct and transcend the borders of taboo. Historically, Goodall’s work has explored idealised fantasy, reflected in his exploration of graphic design, photography and fashion.Poster Girlwas developed as a series of constructed images employing a combination of drawings and photographic constructions, which reinterpreted key popular and iconic assumptions in erotic imagery and re-made these as a critical collection. The series challenged clichés, including the icons of the nun, the nurse and the shepherdess, and re-imagined how these might be represented differently. In seeking to create new images Goodall drew on historical references to Freud and Jung, and to erotica and aesthetics as explored by Beardsley. He employed references to the tigress and to the Medusa myth, and sought to upend erotic perceptions by creating figures such as the ‘Bad Bambi’, which transformed both the sex and figure of the mythical animal alongside the overt use of the mask, fetishised fabrics and idealised glossy colours and finishes. Poster Girlwas shown at the Electric Blue Gallery, London (February – March 2009) with coverage in ‘The Sunday Times Magazine’ of 15 February. In his keynotes at the ‘Semi- Permanent Creative Conference’ in Sydney, March 2010 and a related event in Brisbane (June 2010), Goodall discussedPoster Girland other work.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 6 Feb 2009
Eventexhibition - Electric Blue Gallery, 64 Middlesex St, London, 6 Feb - 6 Mar 2009
Duration: 6 Feb 2009 → …

Fingerprint

Fetish
Erotica
Erotic Art
Fantasy
Archetypes
Aesthetics
Brisbane
Taboo
Iconic
Time Magazine
Artist
Masking
Photography
Nuns
Mask
Allen Jones
Pop Art
Icon
Sunday
Sigmund Freud

Cite this

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title = "Poster Girl: series of prints exploring fetish and erotica",
abstract = "Through illustration, Goodall’s research questions the constructions of erotic art and how these might be rethought through concepts of masking, desire, fetish fashion and dressing-up. Goodall builds on the work of cartoonists such as Eric Stanton, photographer and illustrator John Willie, and artists such as Allen Jones, to challenge the border between pop art and erotica, and to develop a series of works that explore fantasy, myth and reality. In so doing he creates a visual and critical commentary on perceptions of erotic art, while maintaining the archetypes that construct and transcend the borders of taboo. Historically, Goodall’s work has explored idealised fantasy, reflected in his exploration of graphic design, photography and fashion.Poster Girlwas developed as a series of constructed images employing a combination of drawings and photographic constructions, which reinterpreted key popular and iconic assumptions in erotic imagery and re-made these as a critical collection. The series challenged clich{\'e}s, including the icons of the nun, the nurse and the shepherdess, and re-imagined how these might be represented differently. In seeking to create new images Goodall drew on historical references to Freud and Jung, and to erotica and aesthetics as explored by Beardsley. He employed references to the tigress and to the Medusa myth, and sought to upend erotic perceptions by creating figures such as the ‘Bad Bambi’, which transformed both the sex and figure of the mythical animal alongside the overt use of the mask, fetishised fabrics and idealised glossy colours and finishes. Poster Girlwas shown at the Electric Blue Gallery, London (February – March 2009) with coverage in ‘The Sunday Times Magazine’ of 15 February. In his keynotes at the ‘Semi- Permanent Creative Conference’ in Sydney, March 2010 and a related event in Brisbane (June 2010), Goodall discussedPoster Girland other work.",
author = "Jasper Goodall",
year = "2009",
month = "2",
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language = "English",

}

Poster Girl: series of prints exploring fetish and erotica. Goodall, Jasper (Author/Creator). 2009. Event: exhibition, Electric Blue Gallery, 64 Middlesex St, London, 6 Feb - 6 Mar 2009.

Research output: Non-textual outputExhibition

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