'Playing at Being Soldiers?' British women and military uniform in the First World War

Lucy Noakes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNChapter

Abstract

This Chapter examines the impact that the First World War had on women's dress. It focuses on the debates that surrounded women in uniform, both official and unofficial, that appeared in the press during the war, and compares the appearance and reception of women's unofficial, paramilitary organisations with that of the official Women's Army Auxiliary Corps, created in 1917.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBritish Popular Culture and the First World War
EditorsJessica Meyer
Place of PublicationLeiden, Netherlands
PublisherBrill
Pages123-146
Number of pages24
ISBN (Print)9789004166585
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2008

Bibliographical note

This book Chapter is developed from a paper that I delivered at the 2006 Conference 'The First World War and Popular Culture' held at the University of Newcastle, UK

Keywords

  • dress
  • femininity
  • uniform
  • First World War

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    Noakes, L. (2008). 'Playing at Being Soldiers?' British women and military uniform in the First World War. In J. Meyer (Ed.), British Popular Culture and the First World War (pp. 123-146). Brill. http://www.brill.nl/default.aspx?partid=210&pid=30319