Perceptual-cognitive expertise in sport and its acquisition: implications for applied cognitive psychology

A. Mark Williams, Paul Ford, David W. Eccles, P. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

We review contemporary research on perceptual-cognitive expertise in sport and consider implications for those working in the field of applied cognitive psychology. We identify the important perceptual-cognitive skills that facilitate anticipation in sport and illustrate how these skills interact in a dynamic manner during performance. We also highlight our current understanding of how these skills are acquired and consider the extent to which the underlying processes are specific to a particular domain and role within that domain. Next, we briefly review recent attempts to facilitate the acquisition of perceptual-cognitive expertise using simulation training coupled with instruction and feedback on task performance. Finally, we discuss how research on elite athletes can help inform applied cognitive psychologists who are interested in capturing and enhancing perceptual-cognitive expertise across various domains.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)432-442
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jun 2010

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Sports
expertise
psychology
athlete
psychologist
performance
elite
instruction
simulation

Cite this

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Perceptual-cognitive expertise in sport and its acquisition : implications for applied cognitive psychology. / Williams, A. Mark; Ford, Paul; Eccles, David W.; Ward, P.

In: Applied Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 25, No. 3, 28.06.2010, p. 432-442.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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