Overview of Concrete Recycling Legislation and Practice in the United States

Ruoyu Jin, Qian Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Recycling concrete waste helps reduce the negative environmental impacts of construction activities. Worldwide, concrete recycling rates and available applications for recycled concrete vary widely. A deep understanding of the current status of concrete recycling in individual countries or regions would allow development of applicable and effective strategies for improvement. This empirical research on concrete recycling in the United States consists of two parts: a qualitative study of the legislation, regulation, and practice of solid waste management (SWM) and concrete recycling in 45 states and the District of Columbia, and a questionnaire survey of practitioners' views of concrete recycling in Ohio and California. Based on the qualitative analysis, the studied states and district were grouped into three categories, representing advanced, average, and below-average SWM practices, with the majority of states having average to below-average practice and so being in need of improvement. The survey results showed that practitioners in the two selected states have positive, consistent perceptions of the practice and benefits of and recommended methods for concrete recycling and identified no major difficulties except for a lack of government awareness and support. This research not only provides an updated understanding of concrete recycling legislation and practice but also offers useful strategies for government and industry to work together to promote concrete recycling.

Original languageEnglish
Article number05019004
JournalJournal of Construction Engineering and Management
Volume145
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Feb 2019

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legislation
recycling
solid waste
waste management
qualitative analysis
questionnaire survey
management practice
environmental impact
industry

Bibliographical note

This material may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the American Society of Civil Engineers. This material may be found at https://ascelibrary.org/doi/10.1061/%28ASCE%29CO.1943-7862.0001630

Cite this

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Overview of Concrete Recycling Legislation and Practice in the United States. / Jin, Ruoyu; Chen, Qian.

In: Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Vol. 145, No. 4, 05019004, 08.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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