Occupational therapy students' experiences of role-emerging placements and their influence on professional practice

Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisResearch

Abstract

Changes in health and social care present exciting opportunities for occupational therapists to expand their practice into innovative settings. To prepare graduates for these opportunities, placement experiences must reflect current trends in practice. Role-emerging placements are increasingly being used to help students develop the skills, knowledge and attributes needed to become the therapists of tomorrow. Whilst the literature on role-emerging placements is increasing, studies have tended to be general placement evaluations, with limited studies exploring students’ experiences in detail. No studies have explored the influence of role-emerging placements on graduates’ professional practice and identity.
Original languageEnglish
QualificationDoctor of Philosophy
Awarding Institution
  • University of Brighton
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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occupational therapy
graduate
occupational therapist
experience
student
therapist
present
trend
health
evaluation

Bibliographical note

Copyright © and Moral Rights for this thesis are retained by the author and/or other copyright owners.

Cite this

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title = "Occupational therapy students' experiences of role-emerging placements and their influence on professional practice",
abstract = "Changes in health and social care present exciting opportunities for occupational therapists to expand their practice into innovative settings. To prepare graduates for these opportunities, placement experiences must reflect current trends in practice. Role-emerging placements are increasingly being used to help students develop the skills, knowledge and attributes needed to become the therapists of tomorrow. Whilst the literature on role-emerging placements is increasing, studies have tended to be general placement evaluations, with limited studies exploring students’ experiences in detail. No studies have explored the influence of role-emerging placements on graduates’ professional practice and identity.",
author = "Channine Clarke",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} and Moral Rights for this thesis are retained by the author and/or other copyright owners.",
year = "2012",
language = "English",
school = "University of Brighton",

}

TY - THES

T1 - Occupational therapy students' experiences of role-emerging placements and their influence on professional practice

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N1 - Copyright © and Moral Rights for this thesis are retained by the author and/or other copyright owners.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Changes in health and social care present exciting opportunities for occupational therapists to expand their practice into innovative settings. To prepare graduates for these opportunities, placement experiences must reflect current trends in practice. Role-emerging placements are increasingly being used to help students develop the skills, knowledge and attributes needed to become the therapists of tomorrow. Whilst the literature on role-emerging placements is increasing, studies have tended to be general placement evaluations, with limited studies exploring students’ experiences in detail. No studies have explored the influence of role-emerging placements on graduates’ professional practice and identity.

AB - Changes in health and social care present exciting opportunities for occupational therapists to expand their practice into innovative settings. To prepare graduates for these opportunities, placement experiences must reflect current trends in practice. Role-emerging placements are increasingly being used to help students develop the skills, knowledge and attributes needed to become the therapists of tomorrow. Whilst the literature on role-emerging placements is increasing, studies have tended to be general placement evaluations, with limited studies exploring students’ experiences in detail. No studies have explored the influence of role-emerging placements on graduates’ professional practice and identity.

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -