‘No offence to God but I don’t believe in Him’: religion, schooling and children’s rights

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    Abstract

    Since the Children Act (2004) in both England and Wales, schools are expected to give due attention to the issue of children’s rights, particularly respect for the views of pupils in matters that affect them, as outlined in Article 12 of the UNCRC. However, one theme that has been relatively unexplored in the literature on children’s rights and education is religion and the role it plays in everyday school life, an issue that has relevance for Article 12, but also Article 14, which refers to freedom of thought, conscience and religion. This article approaches the topic of religion, schooling and children’s rights empirically, through a focus on rural church schools. It draws on in-depth qualitative research with pupils and other stakeholders from two case study schools in order to explore the significance of ethos values and experiences of religious practices for debates in this area.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)154-171
    JournalEthnography and Education
    Volume13
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 10 Feb 2017

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