New Labour and the politics of antisocial behaviour

Peter Squires

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Tackling Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB) has rapidly become a key issue for the government. It was recently given central place in the 2004–2008 Home Office Strategic Plan, the Prime Minister being prompted to describe, in broad ideological terms, his government's ‘crusade’ against the anti-social within a ‘new consensus’ on criminal justice. Yet ‘ antisocial behaviour’ is often treated as if it were something new; a unique aspect of late modernity. Typically neglected are both the history of the concept itself and alternative understandings of the young, often disadvantaged, people who are the most frequent recipients of the ‘anti-social’ label. The article develops a critical analysis of the political and ideological significance of the problematization of ASB and the criminalization of social policy associated with enforcement driven ASB strategies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)144-168
Number of pages25
JournalCritical Social Policy
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2006

Fingerprint

New Labour
social behavior
politics
crusade
criminalization
minister
modernity
recipient
justice
history

Keywords

  • criminal justice
  • discipline
  • enforcement
  • governance
  • youth

Cite this

Squires, Peter. / New Labour and the politics of antisocial behaviour. In: Critical Social Policy. 2006 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 144-168.
@article{3ba4dcaf60644601aae78c07af8f50c3,
title = "New Labour and the politics of antisocial behaviour",
abstract = "Tackling Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB) has rapidly become a key issue for the government. It was recently given central place in the 2004–2008 Home Office Strategic Plan, the Prime Minister being prompted to describe, in broad ideological terms, his government's ‘crusade’ against the anti-social within a ‘new consensus’ on criminal justice. Yet ‘ antisocial behaviour’ is often treated as if it were something new; a unique aspect of late modernity. Typically neglected are both the history of the concept itself and alternative understandings of the young, often disadvantaged, people who are the most frequent recipients of the ‘anti-social’ label. The article develops a critical analysis of the political and ideological significance of the problematization of ASB and the criminalization of social policy associated with enforcement driven ASB strategies.",
keywords = "criminal justice, discipline, enforcement, governance, youth",
author = "Peter Squires",
year = "2006",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1177/0261018306059769",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "144--168",
journal = "Critical Social Policy",
issn = "0261-0183",
number = "1",

}

New Labour and the politics of antisocial behaviour. / Squires, Peter.

In: Critical Social Policy, Vol. 26, No. 1, 02.2006, p. 144-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - New Labour and the politics of antisocial behaviour

AU - Squires, Peter

PY - 2006/2

Y1 - 2006/2

N2 - Tackling Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB) has rapidly become a key issue for the government. It was recently given central place in the 2004–2008 Home Office Strategic Plan, the Prime Minister being prompted to describe, in broad ideological terms, his government's ‘crusade’ against the anti-social within a ‘new consensus’ on criminal justice. Yet ‘ antisocial behaviour’ is often treated as if it were something new; a unique aspect of late modernity. Typically neglected are both the history of the concept itself and alternative understandings of the young, often disadvantaged, people who are the most frequent recipients of the ‘anti-social’ label. The article develops a critical analysis of the political and ideological significance of the problematization of ASB and the criminalization of social policy associated with enforcement driven ASB strategies.

AB - Tackling Anti-Social Behaviour (ASB) has rapidly become a key issue for the government. It was recently given central place in the 2004–2008 Home Office Strategic Plan, the Prime Minister being prompted to describe, in broad ideological terms, his government's ‘crusade’ against the anti-social within a ‘new consensus’ on criminal justice. Yet ‘ antisocial behaviour’ is often treated as if it were something new; a unique aspect of late modernity. Typically neglected are both the history of the concept itself and alternative understandings of the young, often disadvantaged, people who are the most frequent recipients of the ‘anti-social’ label. The article develops a critical analysis of the political and ideological significance of the problematization of ASB and the criminalization of social policy associated with enforcement driven ASB strategies.

KW - criminal justice

KW - discipline

KW - enforcement

KW - governance

KW - youth

U2 - 10.1177/0261018306059769

DO - 10.1177/0261018306059769

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 144

EP - 168

JO - Critical Social Policy

JF - Critical Social Policy

SN - 0261-0183

IS - 1

ER -