Medicines management activity with physiotherapy and podiatry

a systematic mixed studies review

Karen Stenner, Jude Edwards, Freda Mold, Simon Otter, Molly Courtenay, Ann Moore, Nicola Carey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Making best use of existing skills to increase service capacity is a global challenge. The aim was to systematically review physiotherapy and podiatrist prescribing and medicines management activity, including evidence of impact on patient care, levels of knowledge and attitudes towards extended medicines role.
Methods: A search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases, using terms to identify prescribing and medicines management across a range of roles, was conducted from January 1985 to May 2016 for physiotherapy, and January 1968 to May 2016 for podiatry. Hand searching of citations and databases from professional organisations was undertaken. Data were extracted and analysed descriptively, and quality appraised by 2 reviewers using the mixed methods appraisal tool.
Results: 1316 papers were identified, and 21 included in the review. No studies were identified that reported prescribing and no studies specific to podiatry met the inclusion criteria. Physiotherapists were highly involved in administering medicines, providing medicines advice, and recommending new medicines. Patient satisfaction, cost and outcomes were equivalent when comparing physiotherapist-led injection therapy to traditional care. Pharmacology knowledge was variable and unmet training needs identified.
Conclusion: Medicines management practices were identified in physiotherapy and positive outcomes of extended scope physiotherapy. There was a lack of evidence regarding podiatric practice. Review of educational preparation for medicines management is recommended along with evaluation of medicines management practice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1333-1339
JournalHealth Policy
Volume122
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Oct 2018

Fingerprint

Podiatry
Physical Therapists
Practice Management
Databases
Patient Satisfaction
MEDLINE
Patient Care
Medicine
Pharmacology
Costs and Cost Analysis
Injections
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • allied health professionals, , ,
  • systematic review
  • medication management
  • physiotherapy
  • podiatry

Cite this

Stenner, Karen ; Edwards, Jude ; Mold, Freda ; Otter, Simon ; Courtenay, Molly ; Moore, Ann ; Carey, Nicola. / Medicines management activity with physiotherapy and podiatry : a systematic mixed studies review. In: Health Policy. 2018 ; Vol. 122, No. 12. pp. 1333-1339.
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abstract = "Objective: Making best use of existing skills to increase service capacity is a global challenge. The aim was to systematically review physiotherapy and podiatrist prescribing and medicines management activity, including evidence of impact on patient care, levels of knowledge and attitudes towards extended medicines role.Methods: A search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases, using terms to identify prescribing and medicines management across a range of roles, was conducted from January 1985 to May 2016 for physiotherapy, and January 1968 to May 2016 for podiatry. Hand searching of citations and databases from professional organisations was undertaken. Data were extracted and analysed descriptively, and quality appraised by 2 reviewers using the mixed methods appraisal tool.Results: 1316 papers were identified, and 21 included in the review. No studies were identified that reported prescribing and no studies specific to podiatry met the inclusion criteria. Physiotherapists were highly involved in administering medicines, providing medicines advice, and recommending new medicines. Patient satisfaction, cost and outcomes were equivalent when comparing physiotherapist-led injection therapy to traditional care. Pharmacology knowledge was variable and unmet training needs identified. Conclusion: Medicines management practices were identified in physiotherapy and positive outcomes of extended scope physiotherapy. There was a lack of evidence regarding podiatric practice. Review of educational preparation for medicines management is recommended along with evaluation of medicines management practice.",
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Stenner, K, Edwards, J, Mold, F, Otter, S, Courtenay, M, Moore, A & Carey, N 2018, 'Medicines management activity with physiotherapy and podiatry: a systematic mixed studies review', Health Policy, vol. 122, no. 12, pp. 1333-1339. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.healthpol.2018.10.004

Medicines management activity with physiotherapy and podiatry : a systematic mixed studies review. / Stenner, Karen ; Edwards, Jude; Mold, Freda; Otter, Simon; Courtenay, Molly; Moore, Ann; Carey, Nicola.

In: Health Policy, Vol. 122, No. 12, 10.10.2018, p. 1333-1339.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Carey, Nicola

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N2 - Objective: Making best use of existing skills to increase service capacity is a global challenge. The aim was to systematically review physiotherapy and podiatrist prescribing and medicines management activity, including evidence of impact on patient care, levels of knowledge and attitudes towards extended medicines role.Methods: A search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases, using terms to identify prescribing and medicines management across a range of roles, was conducted from January 1985 to May 2016 for physiotherapy, and January 1968 to May 2016 for podiatry. Hand searching of citations and databases from professional organisations was undertaken. Data were extracted and analysed descriptively, and quality appraised by 2 reviewers using the mixed methods appraisal tool.Results: 1316 papers were identified, and 21 included in the review. No studies were identified that reported prescribing and no studies specific to podiatry met the inclusion criteria. Physiotherapists were highly involved in administering medicines, providing medicines advice, and recommending new medicines. Patient satisfaction, cost and outcomes were equivalent when comparing physiotherapist-led injection therapy to traditional care. Pharmacology knowledge was variable and unmet training needs identified. Conclusion: Medicines management practices were identified in physiotherapy and positive outcomes of extended scope physiotherapy. There was a lack of evidence regarding podiatric practice. Review of educational preparation for medicines management is recommended along with evaluation of medicines management practice.

AB - Objective: Making best use of existing skills to increase service capacity is a global challenge. The aim was to systematically review physiotherapy and podiatrist prescribing and medicines management activity, including evidence of impact on patient care, levels of knowledge and attitudes towards extended medicines role.Methods: A search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases, using terms to identify prescribing and medicines management across a range of roles, was conducted from January 1985 to May 2016 for physiotherapy, and January 1968 to May 2016 for podiatry. Hand searching of citations and databases from professional organisations was undertaken. Data were extracted and analysed descriptively, and quality appraised by 2 reviewers using the mixed methods appraisal tool.Results: 1316 papers were identified, and 21 included in the review. No studies were identified that reported prescribing and no studies specific to podiatry met the inclusion criteria. Physiotherapists were highly involved in administering medicines, providing medicines advice, and recommending new medicines. Patient satisfaction, cost and outcomes were equivalent when comparing physiotherapist-led injection therapy to traditional care. Pharmacology knowledge was variable and unmet training needs identified. Conclusion: Medicines management practices were identified in physiotherapy and positive outcomes of extended scope physiotherapy. There was a lack of evidence regarding podiatric practice. Review of educational preparation for medicines management is recommended along with evaluation of medicines management practice.

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