Measuring students' engagement in learning volumes of revolution when using advanced visualization media in an active learning environment

Fadi Castronovo, Jesus Oliver, Andrew Stanciulescu

    Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

    Abstract

    The growing adoption of active learning strategies is changing teaching practices in many disciplines. In particular, mathematics instructors are increasingly using active learning methods to engage students in the classroom and reduce achievement gaps. In this study, the researchers present a pilot-study implementation of an active learning task in a Mathematics course. The task was modeled as a problem-solving group activity utilizing visualization systems in order to promote increased student engagement with relevant course content. The pilot study consisted of a one-group pre-test / post-test experimental design. To assess the effects of the activity, the team evaluated several engagement dependent variables, such as self-efficacy, perceived usefulness, effort regulation, and task-attraction. The students in the experimental group were then exposed to an independent variable, i.e. type of learning activities, with two levels of treatment, group-based visualization activity versus traditional classroom with a group-based activity. The visualization equipment used was an 18' HoyluTM Huddlewall projection system designed to facilitate teams in performing design and problem-solving processes. The research team was able to collect data from 15 participants. The participants were students enrolled in a Calculus 2 class at CSU East Bay. A paired-samples T-Test was used to determine whether there was a statistically significant mean difference between the students' self-efficacy, task attraction, perceived usefulness, and effort regulation when they participated in the visualization activity compared to a traditional classroom. The analysis of the results showed a significant difference between the students' self-efficacy, task attraction, and perceived usefulness, but not for effort regulation. These results support the researchers' initial hypothesis that such an activity would stimulate the students' engagement. The significance of these results contributes to the growing research on the use of visualization media and active and group-based learning in Mathematics courses.

    Original languageEnglish
    Publication statusPublished - 22 Jun 2020
    Event2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference, ASEE 2020 - Virtual, Online
    Duration: 22 Jun 202026 Jun 2020

    Conference

    Conference2020 ASEE Virtual Annual Conference, ASEE 2020
    CityVirtual, Online
    Period22/06/2026/06/20

    Bibliographical note

    Funding Information:
    The Department of Mathematics at the California State University is a Phase 2 partner in the Student Engagement in Mathematics through an Institutional Network for Active Learning (SEMINAL) project funded by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities and the National Science Foundation. The SEMINAL project at CSU East Bay aims to encourage and support the coordinated use of active learning in Mathematics classes within the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) pathway.

    Funding Information:
    The authors’ work was generously supported by the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, the National Science Foundation, and the CSU East Bay College of Science.

    Publisher Copyright:
    © American Society for Engineering Education 2020.

    Copyright:
    Copyright 2020 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Measuring students' engagement in learning volumes of revolution when using advanced visualization media in an active learning environment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this