Living in single person households and the risk of isolation

Laura Banks, Philip Haynes, Michael Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Data from the International Social Survey Programme (2001) was used to analyse the social networks of older people and whether living in single person households increased the risk of isolation. When comparing respondents with one or more adult children, there was no significant difference in the likelihood of experiencing familial isolation between people living in single person households and those living in larger households. A majority of those living in single person households had at least regular contact with a sibling, adult child or close friend and participated in a social organisation. Friends compensate to some extent for a lack of support from the family, although in southern and eastern European countries, other relatives appeared to be more important in support networks. People living in single person households were more likely to experience isolation, but this was largely related to advanced age and childlessness. Whilst a very small minority in Japan were living in single person households, they were significantly more likely to be severely isolated than those living in single person households in other countries.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)55-86
Number of pages32
JournalInternational Journal of Ageing and Later Life
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2009

Keywords

  • isolation
  • older people
  • single person households
  • childlessness
  • ISSP

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Living in single person households and the risk of isolation'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this