Listening to the voices of young people in school

Carol Robinson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Conference proceeding with ISSN or ISBNChapter

Abstract

In recent years there has been a growing move within the UK, as well as in other countries, to consider pupils’ perspectives and ‘voices’ on aspects of school-related issues, including learning and teaching. Pupil voice work involves engaging with pupils about issues that matter to them and that affect their experiences in school. This chapter focuses on ‘pupil voice’ work, what it ‘looks like’ in the school context and the significance of it for both teachers and pupils. The chapter gives consideration to terms used when referring to pupil voice work, it outlines factors that have led to an increased importance now being placed on pupils’ voices, and identifies ways in which teachers can listen to the voices of those they teach. The chapgter also considers how implementing such practices can make learning more meaningful for pupils and, as a result, improve the learning and experiences of young people in schools.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationLearning to teach in the primary school
EditorsT. Cremin, J. Arthur
Place of PublicationAbingdon
PublisherRoutledge
Pages436-451
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781315812960
ISBN (Print)9780415818193
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Listening to the voices of young people in school'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Robinson, C. (2014). Listening to the voices of young people in school. In T. Cremin, & J. Arthur (Eds.), Learning to teach in the primary school (pp. 436-451). Routledge.