Involving people in e-health: results from a UK research study on the potential of ICTs to support weight management

Audrey Marshall, Flis Henwood, Leslie Carlin, Elizabeth Guy, Helen Smith

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned reportResearch

Abstract

This paper discusses Net.Weight, a research study which examined the potential of information and communication technologies (ICTs) to support people managing their weight. The context for Net.Weight was an acknowledgement that technology has a role to play in enabling wider engagement in the shaping of health care and services, but also that there is a need for more critical reflection about where and how technology can best be applied. It uses an existing three-level model of involvement, information, feedback and participation, to discuss the findings. It also makes use of the distinction, in the same model, between individual and group modes of involvement. It concludes that, with facilitation, people operate on a continuum, moving through the information, feedback and participation levels and that they operate in both individual and group modes. This has implications for health policy shaping as well as for an understanding of information and health literacy.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011

Fingerprint

communication technology
information technology
health
management
participation
health policy
health service
Group
literacy
health care

Keywords

  • health informatics
  • ICTs
  • involvement
  • policy shaping
  • weight management

Cite this

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Involving people in e-health: results from a UK research study on the potential of ICTs to support weight management. / Marshall, Audrey; Henwood, Flis; Carlin, Leslie; Guy, Elizabeth; Smith, Helen.

2011. 9 p.

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned reportResearch

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